Michaeleen Doucleff Michaeleen Doucleff is a reporter for NPR's Science Desk.
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Michaeleen Doucleff 2016
Sanjit Das/NPR

Michaeleen Doucleff

Reporter, Science Desk

Michaeleen Doucleff is a reporter for NPR's Science Desk. She reports for the radio and the Web for NPR's global health and development blog, Goats and Soda. Doucleff focuses on disease outbreaks, drug development, and trends in global health.

In 2014, Doucleff was part of the team that earned a George Foster Peabody award for its coverage of the Ebola outbreak in West Africa. For the series, Doucleff reported on how the epidemic ravaged maternal health and how the virus spreads through the air. In 2015, Doucleff and Senior Producer Jane Greenhalgh reported on the extreme prejudices faced by young women in Nepal when they're menstruating. Their story was the second most popular one on the NPR website in 2015 and contributed to the NPR series on 15-year-old girls around the world, which won two Gracie Awards.

As a science journalist, Doucleff has reported on a broad range of topics, from vaccination fears and the microbiome to beer biophysics and dog psychology.

Before coming to NPR in 2012, Doucleff was an editor at the journal Cell, where she wrote about the science behind pop culture. Doucleff has a doctorate in chemistry from the University of Berkeley, California, and a master's degree in viticulture and enology from the University of California, Davis.

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Influenza covers its shell with two types of accessories: the H spike, blue, and the N spike, red. Here the flu particle is sliced open to show its genetic material. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases hide caption

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Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases

In August 2014, Dr. Thomas Frieden, director of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, talked with Doctors Without Borders staff during a visit to an Ebola treatment center in Monrovia, Liberia. Tommy Trenchard for NPR hide caption

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Smartphone Detox: How To Power Down In A Wired World

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Are There Zombie Viruses In The Thawing Permafrost?

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The Permafrost Tunnel Research Facility, dug in the mid-1960s, allows scientists a three-dimensional look at frozen ground. Kate Ramsayer/NASA hide caption

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Is There A Ticking Time Bomb Under The Arctic?

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Cameroonian kids were part of an experiment based on the classic "marshmallow test": Put a single treat before a child but tell the child if he or she waits, say, 10 minutes, a second treat will be given. ZenShui/Michele Constantini/Getty Images/PhotoAlto hide caption

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So It's Just You And A Marshmallow: Would You Pass The Test?

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Race To Eradicate Guinea Worm And Polio Experienced Roadblocks In 2017

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About 180,000 babies develop hydrocephalus each year in sub-Saharan Africa. Baby Faridah received treatment for the deadly condition this year at the CURE Children's Hospital of Uganda in Mbale, Uganda. Christopher Mullen, CURE International hide caption

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Christopher Mullen, CURE International

Archaeologists are excavating an ancient cabin at the Rising Whale site. Cape Espenberg Birnirk Project hide caption

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How To Survive Climate Change? Clues Are Buried In The Arctic

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A girl is vaccinated against dengue as part of a public immunization program for children in the Philippines. The program was suspended after the company raised safety concerns about the vaccination. Dondi Tawatao/Getty Images hide caption

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A woman farmer makes hay bales in Kashmir, India. In India, women comprise about a third of the agricultural labor in developing countries. NurPhoto/NurPhoto via Getty Images hide caption

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Working Moms Have Been A 'Thing' Since Ancient History

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