Michaeleen Doucleff Michaeleen Doucleff is a correspondent for NPR's Science Desk.
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Michaeleen Doucleff

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Michaeleen Doucleff 2016
Sanjit Das/NPR

Michaeleen Doucleff

Correspondent, Science Desk

Michaeleen Doucleff, PhD, is a correspondent for NPR's Science Desk. For nearly a decade, she has been reporting for the radio and the web for NPR's global health outlet, Goats and Soda. Doucleff focuses on disease outbreaks, cross-cultural parenting, and women and children's health.

In 2014, Doucleff was part of the team that earned a George Foster Peabody award for its coverage of the Ebola outbreak in West Africa. For the series, Doucleff reported on how the epidemic ravaged maternal health and how the virus spreads through the air. In 2019, Doucleff and Senior Producer Jane Greenhalgh produced a story about how Inuit parents teach children to control their anger. That story was the most popular one on NPR.org for the year; altogether readers have spent more than 16 years worth of time reading it.

In 2021, Doucleff published a book, called Hunt, Gather, Parent, stemming from her reporting at NPR. That book became a New York Times bestseller.

Before coming to NPR in 2012, Doucleff was an editor at the journal Cell, where she wrote about the science behind pop culture. Doucleff has a bachelor degree in biology from Caltech, a doctorate in physical chemistry from the University of Berkeley, California, and a master's degree in viticulture and enology from the University of California, Davis.

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A new version of the omicron variant has scientists on alert

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A resident receives a dose of the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine at a health center in Jakarta, Indonesia, on Jan. 13. This week, Indonesia started a program to give booster shots to the elderly and people at risk of severe disease. Dimas Ardian/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Dimas Ardian/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Booster longevity: Data reveals how long a third shot protects

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New data shows how long protection may last from a COVID vaccine booster shot

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This colorized transmission electron micrograph image shows SARS-CoV-2, the coronavirus that causes the disease COVID-19. This specimen was isolated from a patient in the United States. Particles of the virus (yellow) are emerging from the surface of cells cultured in the lab (pink). Science Source hide caption

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Science Source

Why omicron may cause less harm — and what it means for the future of the pandemic

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A commuter masks up for a bus ride in Liverpool, England. The omicron variant of the coronavirus has surged in the U.K. and is now dominant in the U.S. as well. There's now data indicating just how severe its symptoms might be. Paul Ellis/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Paul Ellis/AFP via Getty Images

What we know about the symptoms — and the severity — of the omicron variant

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People infected with omicron have better outcomes than those with delta, study says

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Omicron causes record-breaking COVID cases in the U.S. and globally

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Scientists estimate record U.S. COVID cases attributed to the omicron variant

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Encore: Encouraging collaboration early on can lead to more helpful children

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Health authorities have been urging Americans to get a booster shot six months after their second dose of the vaccine, especially now that the omicron variant is dominant in the U.S. Robyn Beck/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Robyn Beck/AFP via Getty Images

Boosters have been shown to restore some of the protection lost with omicron's rise

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A colorized scanning-electron-microscope image shows SARS-CoV-2 (the round blue objects) emerging from cells cultured in the lab. SARS-CoV-2 is the coronavirus that causes the disease COVID-19. NIAID-RML/Science Source hide caption

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NIAID-RML/Science Source

A woman is vaccinated against COVID-19 at a clinic in Johannesburg on Dec. 6. A new study from South Africa looks at the effectiveness of the Pfizer vaccine in preventing infection and severe disease. Shiraaz Mohamed/AP hide caption

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Shiraaz Mohamed/AP

Vaccine protection vs. omicron infection may drop to 30% but does cut severe disease

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