Nathan Rott Nathan Rott is a correspondent on NPR's National Desk, where he focuses on environment issues and the American West.
Nathan Rott at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., September 27, 2018. (photo by Allison Shelley)
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Nathan Rott

Allison Shelley/NPR
Nathan Rott at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., September 27, 2018. (photo by Allison Shelley)
Allison Shelley/NPR

Nathan Rott

Correspondent, National Desk

Nathan Rott is a correspondent on NPR's National Desk, where he focuses on environment issues and the American West.

Based at NPR West in Culver City, California, Rott spends a lot of his time on the road, covering everything from breaking news stories like California's wildfires to in-depth issues like the management of endangered species and many points between.

Rott owes his start at NPR to two extraordinary young men he never met. As the first recipient of the Stone and Holt Weeks Fellowship in 2010, he aims to honor the memory of the two brothers by carrying on their legacy of making the world a better place.

A graduate of the University of Montana, Rott prefers to be outside at just about every hour of the day. Prior to working at NPR, he worked a variety of jobs including wildland firefighting, commercial fishing, children's theater teaching, and professional snow-shoveling for the United States Antarctic Program. Odds are, he's shoveled more snow than you.

Story Archive

Thursday

The country's two biggest reservoirs are on the Colorado River. Water levels at Lake Powell have dropped steeply during the two-decade megadrought. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Friday

A post-reproductive toothed whale mother and her son. David Ellifrit/Center for Whale Research hide caption

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David Ellifrit/Center for Whale Research

Most animals don't go through menopause. So why do these whales?

Across the animal kingdom, menopause is something of an evolutionary blip. We humans are one of the few animals to experience it. But Sam Ellis, a researcher in animal behavior, argues that this isn't so surprising. "The best way to propagate your genes is to get as many offspring as possible into the next generation," says Ellis. "The best way to do that is almost always to reproduce your whole life."

Most animals don't go through menopause. So why do these whales?

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Friday

For lease sign in Los Angeles. PATRICK T. FALLON/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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PATRICK T. FALLON/AFP via Getty Images

Monday

Julius Csotonyi

One woolly mammoth's journey at the end of the Ice Age

Lately, paleoecologist Audrey Rowe has been a bit preoccupied with a girl named Elma. That's because Elma is ... a woolly mammoth. And 14,000 years ago, when Elma was alive, her habitat in interior Alaska was rapidly changing. The Ice Age was coming to a close and human hunters were starting early settlements. Which leads to an intriguing question: Who, or what, killed her? In the search for answers, Audrey traces Elma's life and journey through — get this — a single tusk. Today, she shares her insights on what the mammoth extinction from thousands of years ago can teach us about megafauna extinctions today with guest host Nate Rott.

One woolly mammoth's journey at the end of the Ice Age

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Friday

Jason Edwards/Getty Images

Monday

Ninety-seven percent of migratory fish species are facing extinction. Whale sharks, the world's largest living fish, are among the endangered. Ullstein Bild/Ullstein Bild hide caption

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Ullstein Bild/Ullstein Bild

Tuesday

An atmospheric river has been pounding California. When will the rain end?

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Monday

A powerful storm has several California communities on alert

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Sunday

Wednesday

Olha Bilianska's husband was mobilized two years ago. Even after being injured, he is being redeployed. "Some people still believe that this war won't get them," Bilianska says. "It will get them. This war is cruel." Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

Friday

Hotter than normal temperatures are exacerbating the megadrought that's depleted Western water reserves, like Elephant Butte Reservoir in southern New Mexico, new research finds. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images

Saturday

Sushi rolls with cream cheese, a popular ingredient in Ukrainian sushi, are served at Island Sushi in Zaporizhzhia, Ukraine. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

Thursday

Wednesday

Utility workers north of Lyman, Ukraine, work on restringing electrical poles in an effort to brace the country's energy system against another winter of expected Russian attacks. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

Ukraine is trying to keep its lights on this winter. Russia aims to turn them off

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Sultan al-Jaber of the United Arab Emirates, right, celebrates the end of the COP28 climate meeting with United Nations Climate Chief Simon Stiell, left, and COP28 CEO Adnan Amin on Dec. 13, 2023, in Dubai. The final deal included a modest reference to transitioning away from fossil fuels, which scientists say is crucial to avoid catastrophic warming. Kamran Jebreili/AP hide caption

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Kamran Jebreili/AP

COP28 in Dubai ends with agreement for nations to transition away from fossil fuels

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Sunday

COP28 Update: Promises And Regrets

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Wednesday

Another Ukrainian wartime winter brings long-range Russian missile and drone strikes

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Utility workers string new power lines from pole to pole in an area North of Lyman in Ukraine. Work to repair this thread of Ukraine's electrical grid is carried out under the threat of Russian shelling in flak jackets and combat helmets. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

Ukraine prepares for winter attacks on infrastructure

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Monday

Sushi in Ukraine: Life (and the consumer economy) continues through 2 years of war

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Monday

Wind turbines generate electricity off the coast of England. World leaders will meet later this week in Dubai to discuss global efforts to reduce emissions of planet-warming pollution and transition to renewable energy sources. Frank Augstein/AP hide caption

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Frank Augstein/AP

Wednesday

As winter nears, Ukraine fears the U.S. will stop assisting in the war against Russia

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Tuesday

Defense Secretary Lloyd Austin traveled to Ukraine to pledge long-term U.S. support

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