Nathan Rott Nathan Rott is a correspondent on NPR's National Desk, where he focuses on environment issues and the American West.
Nathan Rott at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., September 27, 2018. (photo by Allison Shelley)
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Nathan Rott

Allison Shelley/NPR
Nathan Rott at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., September 27, 2018. (photo by Allison Shelley)
Allison Shelley/NPR

Nathan Rott

Correspondent, National Desk

Nathan Rott is a correspondent on NPR's National Desk, where he focuses on environment issues and the American West.

Based at NPR West in Culver City, California, Rott spends a lot of his time on the road, covering everything from breaking news stories like California's wildfires to in-depth issues like the management of endangered species and many points between.

Rott owes his start at NPR to two extraordinary young men he never met. As the first recipient of the Stone and Holt Weeks Fellowship in 2010, he aims to honor the memory of the two brothers by carrying on their legacy of making the world a better place.

A graduate of the University of Montana, Rott prefers to be outside at just about every hour of the day. Prior to working at NPR, he worked a variety of jobs including wildland firefighting, commercial fishing, children's theater teaching, and professional snow-shoveling for the United States Antarctic Program. Odds are, he's shoveled more snow than you.

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Los Angeles Mourns Lakers Legend Kobe Bryant

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Trump EPA Dramatically Reduces Amount Of Waterways Under Federal Protection

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Some Hope Wildfires Will Change Australia's Relationship With Coal

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Levi Draheim, 11, wears a dust mask as he participates in a demonstration in Miami in July 2019. A lawsuit filed by him and other young people urging action against climate change was thrown out by a federal appeals court Friday. Wilfredo Lee/AP hide caption

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Kids' Climate Case 'Reluctantly' Dismissed By Appeals Court

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Much of New South Wales, Australia, including the Sydney Opera House, lay under a shroud of smoke Thursday. The state remains under severe or very high fire danger warnings as more than 60 fires continue to burn within its borders. Cassie Trotter/Getty Images hide caption

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How Australian Wildfire Emissions May Impact Global Climate

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Biologists pile recently dead mussel shells on the edge of the Clinch River after documenting the species' number and type. The smell can get "real bad," says biologist Rose Agbalog. Nathan Rott/NPR hide caption

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Nature's 'Brita Filter' Is Dying And Nobody Knows Why

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Why Freshwater Mussels Are Dying

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Climate researcher Juliano Calil helps a resident of Turner Station use the virtual reality program he created to show the expected impacts of sea level rise there. Nathan Rott/NPR hide caption

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How Virtual Reality Can Help People Better Understand Climate Change

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States Of Emergency And Possible Power Cuts As California Faces Wildfires

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Fast-Moving Wildfires And Strong Winds Cause Disruptions And Concern In California

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The Tongass National Forest, near Ketchikan, Alaska. The spruce, hemlock and cedar trees of the Tongass have been a source of timber for the logging industry. Elissa Nadworny/NPR hide caption

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Wildfires In Southern California

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