Nathan Rott Nathan Rott is a correspondent on NPR's National Desk, where he focuses on environment issues and the American West.
Nathan Rott at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., September 27, 2018. (photo by Allison Shelley)
Stories By

Nathan Rott

Allison Shelley/NPR
Nathan Rott at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., September 27, 2018. (photo by Allison Shelley)
Allison Shelley/NPR

Nathan Rott

Correspondent, National Desk

Nathan Rott is a correspondent on NPR's National Desk, where he focuses on environment issues and the American West.

Based at NPR West in Culver City, California, Rott spends a lot of his time on the road, covering everything from breaking news stories like California's wildfires to in-depth issues like the management of endangered species and many points between.

Rott owes his start at NPR to two extraordinary young men he never met. As the first recipient of the Stone and Holt Weeks Fellowship in 2010, he aims to honor the memory of the two brothers by carrying on their legacy of making the world a better place.

A graduate of the University of Montana, Rott prefers to be outside at just about every hour of the day. Prior to working at NPR, he worked a variety of jobs including wildland firefighting, commercial fishing, children's theater teaching, and professional snow-shoveling for the United States Antarctic Program. Odds are, he's shoveled more snow than you.

Story Archive

Wildfires Are Roaring In The West — But Not All Of Them Are Bad

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1018924684/1018924685" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The Deadliest Fire In American History Happened In A Place You Wouldn't Expect

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1013898724/1013898725" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Biden Wants To Take On Heat-Buckled Roads In His Infrastructure Update

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1011901569/1011901570" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Warming Climate Amplifies The Risks Of Wildfire Season

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1005418993/1005418994" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Members of the Montana Conservation Corps work on trails near Tally Lake. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Claire Harbage/NPR

A roller coaster that once sat on the Funtown Pier in Seaside Heights, N.J., rests in the ocean on Oct. 31, 2012, after the pier was washed away by Hurricane Sandy. Julio Cortez/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Julio Cortez/AP

Members of the Montana Conservation Corps (MCC) work on trails near Tally Lake in northwestern Montana. President Biden wants to retool and relaunch one of the country's most celebrated government programs: the Civilian Conservation Corps. MCC crews are already doing some of the work envisioned in Biden's climate proposal. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Claire Harbage/NPR

Reaching Back To The New Deal, Biden Proposes A Civilian Climate Corps

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/993976948/995628729" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Biden's Civilian Climate Corps Would Tackle Climate Change, Care For Public Lands

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/994812209/994812259" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Climate Scientists: Nature's Destruction Makes Humans More Vulnerable To Disease

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/990088422/990088423" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

President Biden delivers opening remarks to the virtual Leaders Summit on Climate from the East Room of the White House on Thursday. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Evan Vucci/AP

U.S. bald eagle populations have more than quadrupled in the lower 48 states since 2009, according to a new survey from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Prisma Bildagentur/Universal Images Group via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Prisma Bildagentur/Universal Images Group via Getty Images

A thin strip of sand is all that stands between multimillion-dollar homes on the Southern California coast and a rising Pacific Ocean. A state bill aims to buy, then rent out such properties until they're no longer habitable. Axel Koester/Corbis via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Axel Koester/Corbis via Getty Images

California Has A New Idea For Homes At Risk From Rising Seas: Buy, Rent, Retreat

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/978416929/982805757" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Rep. Deb Haaland, D-N.M., is sworn in before her Senate confirmation hearing to be interior secretary last month. Her confirmation makes her the United States' first Native American Cabinet secretary. Jim Watson/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Jim Watson/AP