Nathan Rott Nathan Rott is a correspondent on NPR's National Desk, where he focuses on environment issues and the American West.
Nathan Rott at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., September 27, 2018. (photo by Allison Shelley)
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Nathan Rott

Allison Shelley/NPR
Nathan Rott at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., September 27, 2018. (photo by Allison Shelley)
Allison Shelley/NPR

Nathan Rott

Correspondent, National Desk

Nathan Rott is a correspondent on NPR's National Desk, where he focuses on environment issues and the American West.

Based at NPR West in Culver City, California, Rott spends a lot of his time on the road, covering everything from breaking news stories like California's wildfires to in-depth issues like the management of endangered species and many points between.

Rott owes his start at NPR to two extraordinary young men he never met. As the first recipient of the Stone and Holt Weeks Fellowship in 2010, he aims to honor the memory of the two brothers by carrying on their legacy of making the world a better place.

A graduate of the University of Montana, Rott prefers to be outside at just about every hour of the day. Prior to working at NPR, he worked a variety of jobs including wildland firefighting, commercial fishing, children's theater teaching, and professional snow-shoveling for the United States Antarctic Program. Odds are, he's shoveled more snow than you.

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Ridgecrest Residents Prepare For More After Earthquakes

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Aftershocks Rattle Southern California Following 2 Quakes

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Considering 'Managed Retreat'

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In California's Mojave Desert sits First Solar Inc.'s Desert Sunlight Solar Farm. California is among the states leading the decarbonization charge. Tim Rue/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Tim Rue/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Going 'Zero Carbon' Is All The Rage. But Will It Slow Climate Change?

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Floodwaters from the Arkansas River line either side of a road in Russellville, Ark., in late May, engulfing businesses and vehicles. Nathan Rott/NPR hide caption

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How Extreme Weather Is Affecting People's Opinions Of Climate Change

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Robert Stobaugh looks at a field of rice, planted a few weeks ago, that has been flooded by the nearby Arkansas River. Nathan Rott/NPR hide caption

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'Completely Catastrophic': Flooding And Tariffs Causing Chaos For Farmers

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John and Louise Hutchins stand in their garage in Fort Smith, Ark., behind a homemade sandbag barrier. They chose not to evacuate, in part because they did not think their neighborhood would flood. Nathan Rott/NPR hide caption

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Rain Keeps Falling In Oklahoma As State's Levees Are Tested

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Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Scott Pruitt was among the most controversial of President Trump's original Cabinet-level picks. Pete Marovich/Getty Images hide caption

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"Nature is declining globally at rates unprecedented in human history," a U.N. panel says, reporting that around 1 million species are currently at risk. Here, an endangered hawksbill turtle swims in a Singapore aquarium in 2017. Roslan Rahman/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Roslan Rahman/AFP/Getty Images

1 Million Animal And Plant Species Are At Risk Of Extinction, U.N. Report Says

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