Nathan Rott Nathan Rott is a correspondent on NPR's National Desk, where he focuses on environment issues and the American West.
Nathan Rott at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., September 27, 2018. (photo by Allison Shelley)
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Nathan Rott

Allison Shelley/NPR
Nathan Rott at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., September 27, 2018. (photo by Allison Shelley)
Allison Shelley/NPR

Nathan Rott

Correspondent, National Desk

Nathan Rott is a correspondent on NPR's National Desk, where he focuses on environment issues and the American West.

Based at NPR West in Culver City, California, Rott spends a lot of his time on the road, covering everything from breaking news stories like California's wildfires to in-depth issues like the management of endangered species and many points between.

Rott owes his start at NPR to two extraordinary young men he never met. As the first recipient of the Stone and Holt Weeks Fellowship in 2010, he aims to honor the memory of the two brothers by carrying on their legacy of making the world a better place.

A graduate of the University of Montana, Rott prefers to be outside at just about every hour of the day. Prior to working at NPR, he worked a variety of jobs including wildland firefighting, commercial fishing, children's theater teaching, and professional snow-shoveling for the United States Antarctic Program. Odds are, he's shoveled more snow than you.

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West Atlanta resident Harriet Feggins has been out of work since March because of the pandemic. So far she has managed to pay her electric bill by scraping together odd jobs and dipping into her 401(k). "I'm trying to do everything I can," she says, but she worries it won't be enough. Lynsey Weatherspoon for NPR hide caption

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Lynsey Weatherspoon for NPR

'Tidal Wave' Of Power Shut-Offs Looms As Nation Grapples With Heat

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California Surpasses New York In Total COVID-19 Cases

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Animals See A Silver Lining During Pandemic As Fewer Are Killed On The Road

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Scientists Say The Coronavirus Pandemic Has Worsened Deforestation Worldwide

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The closer humans are to animals, the greater the opportunity for zoonotic spillover, where a pathogen jumps from animal to human. Zoë van Dijk for NPR hide caption

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Peace Prevails After Another Night Of Protests For George Floyd

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The ancient Gondwana Rainforests of Australia were damaged by recent wildfires. A new study finds the world lost roughly one-third of its old growth forest in the past century. Nathan Rott/NPR hide caption

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Flights Into The Stratosphere Study Changes To Atmospheric Rivers

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Calif. Governor Says State Will Begin Easing Coronavirus Closures

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Beachgoers return to Port Hueneme Beach, Calif., on Thursday. Ventura County beaches and parks have been scheduled to reopen this week with some restrictions. Mark J. Terrill/AP hide caption

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Mark J. Terrill/AP

Examples of face masks range from simple bandanas to homemade face coverings to scarves wrapped around someone's head. @x_friel, @sduncanmor, @NEELM4NI hide caption

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@x_friel, @sduncanmor, @NEELM4NI

If a natural disaster hits during the COVID-19 pandemic, evacuation shelters like this one in California would be dangerous. Agencies are planning for alternatives. Hector Mata/AP hide caption

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Hector Mata/AP

'Hope Isn't A Strategy.' How To Prepare For A Natural Disaster During COVID-19

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Trump Administration Finalizes Fuel Economy Standards Rollback, A Key Policy Goal

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