Rebecca Davis
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Rebecca Davis

Rebecca Davis

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Becky Harlan/NPR

The Plastic Problem Isn't Your Fault, But You Can Be Part Of The Solution

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Until the 19th century, scientists did not understand the role of hand-washing in disease prevention. Thomas Lohnes/DDP/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Thomas Lohnes/DDP/AFP via Getty Images

Computer generated illustration of the moment a bacteriophage lands onto the surface of a bacterium. NANOCLUSTERING/SCIENCE PHOTO LIB/Getty Images/Science Photo Libra hide caption

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NANOCLUSTERING/SCIENCE PHOTO LIB/Getty Images/Science Photo Libra

Going to stay with family means exposing more than one household. Can testing in advance keep everyone safe? Noel Hendrickson/Getty Images hide caption

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Noel Hendrickson/Getty Images

What It's Like To Be Quarantined On A Cruise Ship For Coronavirus

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Computer generated illustration of the moment a bacteriophage lands onto the surface of a bacterium. NANOCLUSTERING/SCIENCE PHOTO LIB/Getty Images/Science Photo Libra hide caption

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NANOCLUSTERING/SCIENCE PHOTO LIB/Getty Images/Science Photo Libra

Justine Adhiambo Obura, chairwoman of the No Sex For Fish cooperative in Nduru Beach, Kenya, stands by her fishing boat. Patrick Higdon, whose name is on the boat, works for the charity World Connect, which gave the group a grant to provide boats for some of the local women. Julia Gunther for NPR hide caption

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Julia Gunther for NPR

No Sex For Fish: How Women In A Fishing Village Are Fighting For Power

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A pile of debris including all kinds of plastics grows hourly at Omni Recycling, a materials recovery facility in Pitman, N.J. Plastic bags are especially problematic because they can get caught in the conveyor belts and equipment and gum up the recycling process. Rebecca Davis/NPR hide caption

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Rebecca Davis/NPR

More U.S. Towns Are Feeling The Pinch As Recycling Becomes Costlier

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Perfect Storm Hits U.S. Recycling Industry

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In 2011, a 17-year-old named Mishka told readers of his Facebook post that his Salem, Ore., high school was "asking for a f***ing shooting." That post and other furious outbursts triggered a quick, but deep evaluation by the school district's threat assessment unit. Beth Nakamura for NPR hide caption

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Beth Nakamura for NPR

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Around the globe, people are searching for ways to reduce plastic waste. Above: Dampalit, a fishing community in Manila Bay, can't keep up with a constant influx of trash. Jes Aznar for NPR hide caption

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Jes Aznar for NPR

Aaron Reid, 20, rests in an exam room in the National Institutes of Health Clinical Center in Bethesda, Md. Rebecca Davis/NPR hide caption

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Rebecca Davis/NPR

Update: A Young Man's Experiment With A 'Living Drug' For Leukemia

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Kelly Zimmerman holds her son Jaxton Wright at a parenting session at the Children's Health Center in Reading, Pa. The free program provides resources and social support to new parents in recovery from addiction, or who are otherwise vulnerable. Natalie Piserchio for NPR hide caption

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Natalie Piserchio for NPR

Beyond Opioids: How A Family Came Together To Stay Together

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