Rebecca Davis
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Rebecca Davis

Story Archive

Sunday

Neudy Rojop decided to work in public health when she was a young girl observing how frequently her young family members and neighbors got sick with unknown illnesses. Luis Echeverria for NPR hide caption

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Luis Echeverria for NPR

A kid in Guatemala had a dream. Today she's a disease detective

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Wednesday

Wielding the "insectazooka," Cecilia González prepares to collect mosquitoes from a house in the village of Los Encuentros, Guatemala. Luis Echeverria for NPR hide caption

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Luis Echeverria for NPR

For these virus-hunting scientists, the 'real gold' is what's in a mosquito's abdomen

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Tuesday

A field researcher holds a male bat that was trapped in an overhead net as part of an effort to find out how the animals pass Nipah virus to humans. The animal will be tested for the virus, examined and ultimately released. Fatima Tuj Johora for NPR hide caption

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Fatima Tuj Johora for NPR

The Nipah virus has a kill rate of 70%. Bats carry it. But how does it jump to humans?

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Tuesday

Conflict in Tigray has led to a collapse of its public health system

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Monday

Meredith Rizzo/NPR

22 tips for 2022: To cut back on plastic, you need to audit how much you use

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Tuesday

Becky Harlan/NPR

The plastic problem isn't your fault, but you can be part of the solution

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Tuesday

Until the 19th century, scientists did not understand the role of hand-washing in disease prevention. Thomas Lohnes/DDP/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Thomas Lohnes/DDP/AFP via Getty Images

Tuesday

Computer generated illustration of the moment a bacteriophage lands onto the surface of a bacterium. NANOCLUSTERING/SCIENCE PHOTO LIB/Getty Images/Science Photo Libra hide caption

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NANOCLUSTERING/SCIENCE PHOTO LIB/Getty Images/Science Photo Libra

Thursday

Going to stay with family means exposing more than one household. Can testing in advance keep everyone safe? Noel Hendrickson/Getty Images hide caption

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Noel Hendrickson/Getty Images

Friday

What It's Like To Be Quarantined On A Cruise Ship For Coronavirus

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Thursday

Computer generated illustration of the moment a bacteriophage lands onto the surface of a bacterium. NANOCLUSTERING/SCIENCE PHOTO LIB/Getty Images/Science Photo Libra hide caption

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NANOCLUSTERING/SCIENCE PHOTO LIB/Getty Images/Science Photo Libra

Thursday

Justine Adhiambo Obura, chairwoman of the No Sex For Fish cooperative in Nduru Beach, Kenya, stands by her fishing boat. Patrick Higdon, whose name is on the boat, works for the charity World Connect, which gave the group a grant to provide boats for some of the local women. Julia Gunther for NPR hide caption

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Julia Gunther for NPR

No Sex For Fish: How Women In A Fishing Village Are Fighting For Power

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Wednesday

A pile of debris including all kinds of plastics grows hourly at Omni Recycling, a materials recovery facility in Pitman, N.J. Plastic bags are especially problematic because they can get caught in the conveyor belts and equipment and gum up the recycling process. Rebecca Davis/NPR hide caption

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Rebecca Davis/NPR

More U.S. Towns Are Feeling The Pinch As Recycling Becomes Costlier

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Tuesday

Perfect Storm Hits U.S. Recycling Industry

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Wednesday

Sorting Out Plastics At The Grocery Store

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Wednesday

In 2011, a 17-year-old named Mishka told readers of his Facebook post that his Salem, Ore., high school was "asking for a f***ing shooting." That post and other furious outbursts triggered a quick, but deep evaluation by the school district's threat assessment unit. Beth Nakamura for NPR hide caption

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Beth Nakamura for NPR

Listen here

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Friday

Around the globe, people are searching for ways to reduce plastic waste. Above: Dampalit, a fishing community in Manila Bay, can't keep up with a constant influx of trash. Jes Aznar for NPR hide caption

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Jes Aznar for NPR

Friday

Aaron Reid, 20, rests in an exam room in the National Institutes of Health Clinical Center in Bethesda, Md. Rebecca Davis/NPR hide caption

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Rebecca Davis/NPR

Update: A Young Man's Experiment With A 'Living Drug' For Leukemia

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Tuesday

Kelly Zimmerman holds her son Jaxton Wright at a parenting session at the Children's Health Center in Reading, Pa. The free program provides resources and social support to new parents in recovery from addiction, or who are otherwise vulnerable. Natalie Piserchio for NPR hide caption

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Natalie Piserchio for NPR

Beyond Opioids: How A Family Came Together To Stay Together

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Sunday

A poster put out by the U.S. Children's Bureau in 1918. Francis Luis Mora/Library of Congress hide caption

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Francis Luis Mora/Library of Congress

Parenting Advice From Uncle Sam

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Wednesday

Samantha Pierce of Cleveland has a 7-year-old daughter, Camryn. In 2009, Pierce gave premature birth to twins. The babies did not survive. Scientists say black women lead more stressful lives, which makes them more likely to give birth prematurely and puts their babies at risk of dying. Dustin Franz for NPR hide caption

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Dustin Franz for NPR

How Racism May Cause Black Mothers To Suffer The Death Of Their Infants

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Saturday

Flooded houses near Lake Houston on Aug. 30, after the storm called Harvey swept through. Sociologist Clare Cooper Marcus says our homes hold our emotional history — our memories, our hopes, our dreams and pain. In some ways our homes are who we are. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

Monday

Some Houstonians Still Haven't Seen Their Homes

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