Sam Sanders Sam Sanders is a correspondent and host of It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders.
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Sam Sanders

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Sam
Josh Huskin/NPR

Sam Sanders

Correspondent and Host, It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

Sam Sanders is a correspondent and host of It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders at NPR. In the show, Sanders engages with journalists, actors, musicians, and listeners to gain the kind of understanding about news and popular culture that can only be reached through conversation. The podcast releases two episodes each week: a "deep dive" interview on Tuesdays, as well as a Friday wrap of the week's news.

Previously, as a key member of NPR's election unit, Sam covered the intersection of culture, pop culture, and politics in the 2016 election, and embedded with the Bernie Sanders campaign for several months. He was also one of the original co-hosts of NPR's Politics Podcast, which launched in 2015.

Sanders joined NPR in 2009 as a Kroc Fellow, and since then has worn many hats within the organization, including field producer and breaking news reporter. He's spent time at three Member stations as well: WUNC in North Carolina, Oregon Public Broadcasting, and WBUR in Boston, as an intern for On Point.

Sanders graduated from the Harvard Kennedy School in 2009 with a master's degree in public policy, with a focus on media and politics. He received his undergraduate degree from the University of the Incarnate Word in San Antonio, Texas, with a double major in political science and music.

In his free time, Sanders runs, eats bacon, and continues his love/hate relationship with Twitter.

Story Archive

Author of Hip Hop (And Other Things) Shea Serrano. Larami Serrano/Grand Central Publishing hide caption

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Larami Serrano/Grand Central Publishing

Shea Serrano answers existential questions about rap in 'Hip Hop (And Other Things)'

Author and host of the No Skips podcast Shea Serrano gets obsessive about things — movies, basketball, and now, rap. In Hip Hop (And Other Things), he dives into Cardi B's explosive 2018, the early days of Missy Elliot's career, and the 1995 Source Awards, which he says remains — to this day — one of the biggest nights in rap history.

Shea Serrano answers existential questions about rap in 'Hip Hop (And Other Things)'

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Shakira onstage during her MTV Unplugged performance, recorded in New York in 1999 and released as a live album in early 2000. Ignacio Gurruchaga/Courtesy of Sony Music hide caption

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Ignacio Gurruchaga/Courtesy of Sony Music

Presenting 'It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders': Pop music's 'Latin Explosion'

This week on Alt.Latino, we're featuring a special episode from our friends at It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders. From the three-part series exploring crossover in pop music, the podcast takes a look at the "Latin Explosion" of the late 1990s and early 2000s.

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Actor Brian Cox as the wealthy patriarch Logan Roy in the HBO show Succession, whose third season premiered on Oct. 17, 2021. Graeme Hunter/Graeme Hunter hide caption

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Graeme Hunter/Graeme Hunter

Why can't Democrats pass legislation? Plus, 'Succession'

Sam chats with NPR national political correspondent Mara Liasson about why dysfunction in the Democratic Party is putting the big "Build Back Better" spending bill in Congressional limbo. Plus, The New Yorker staff writer Doreen St. Felix on Succession, representations of class on TV, and why the plethora of shows about white people being terrible (Succession, The White Lotus, The Undoing, Nine Perfect Strangers, Hacks ... you get the idea) are so addictive. Then, they are joined by The New York Times metro reporter Jazmine Hughes for a game of Who Said That?

Why can't Democrats pass legislation? Plus, 'Succession'

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Jonquilyn Hill hosts Through the Cracks, a podcast from WAMU and PRX, about the disappearance of Relisha Rudd. Jonquilyn Hill hide caption

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Jonquilyn Hill

Two true crime hosts are highlighting missing persons cases that people often ignore

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Comedian Nicole Byer performs onstage. Bryan Bedder/Getty Images for Turner hide caption

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Bryan Bedder/Getty Images for Turner

Nicole Byer's '#VeryFat #VeryBrave' guide to bikini confidence

Sam revisits his 2020 conversation with comedian and Nailed It! host Nicole Byer on her coffee table book: #VeryFat #VeryBrave: The Fat Girl's Guide to Being #Brave and Not a Dejected, Melancholy, Down-in-the-Dumps Weeping Fat Girl in a Bikini. They talk about home goods, drunken bravery, and learning to love yourself.

Nicole Byer's '#VeryFat #VeryBrave' guide to bikini confidence

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In the third part of our series exploring crossover in pop music, we reexamine the so-called "Latin explosion" of the '90s: what it was supposed to be for audiences across the U.S., and what it actually came to represent. Blake Cale for NPR hide caption

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Blake Cale for NPR

Soul Train made its national television premiere 50 years ago, in October 1971. Blake Cale for NPR hide caption

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Blake Cale for NPR

DeAnne Stidham and Mark Stidham, founders of multi-level marketing scheme LuLaRoe, from the documentary Lularich. Courtesy of Amazon Prime Video hide caption

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Courtesy of Amazon Prime Video

'LuLaRich' reveals how MLMs mirror the American economy

Sam interviews women's work and economic justice writer Meg Conley about the documentary series LuLaRich and how vulnerable people still get sucked into multi-level marketing schemes because their shape mirrors the American economy. Then, Harvard Ph.D. candidate and Mormon Studies Fellow at the University of Utah Janan Graham-Russell joins for a game of Who Said That?

'LuLaRich' reveals how MLMs mirror the American economy

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How Janet Jackson's 'Control' shook the room for decades

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Thirty-five years ago, Janet Jackson released an album that changed the course of her career, and of pop music. Blake Cale for NPR hide caption

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Blake Cale for NPR

A father carries his son across the water at the US-Mexico border on the Rio Grande as seen from Ciudad Acuna, Coahuila state, Mexico on September 20, 2021. PAUL RATJE/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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PAUL RATJE/AFP via Getty Images

Has immigration changed much under Biden?

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It's Been 5 Decades Since 'Soul Train' Was First Nationally Syndicated

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Soul Train made its national television premiere 50 years ago, in October 1971. Blake Cale for NPR hide caption

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Blake Cale for NPR