Sam Sanders Sam Sanders is a correspondent and host of It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders.
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Sam Sanders

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Sam Sanders 2017
Corey Seeholzer/NPR

Sam Sanders

Correspondent and Host, It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

Sam Sanders is a correspondent and host of It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders at NPR. In the show, Sanders engages with journalists, actors, musicians, and listeners to gain the kind of understanding about news and popular culture that can only be reached through conversation. The podcast releases two episodes each week: a "deep dive" interview on Tuesdays, as well as a Friday wrap of the week's news.

Previously, as a key member of NPR's election unit, Sam covered the intersection of culture, pop culture, and politics in the 2016 election, and embedded with the Bernie Sanders campaign for several months. He was also one of the original co-hosts of NPR's Politics Podcast, which launched in 2015.

Sanders joined NPR in 2009 as a Kroc Fellow, and since then has worn many hats within the organization, including field producer and breaking news reporter. He's spent time at three Member stations as well: WUNC in North Carolina, Oregon Public Broadcasting, and WBUR in Boston, as an intern for On Point.

Sanders graduated from the Harvard Kennedy School in 2009 with a master's degree in public policy, with a focus on media and politics. He received his undergraduate degree from the University of the Incarnate Word in San Antonio, Texas, with a double major in political science and music.

In his free time, Sanders runs, eats bacon, and continues his love/hate relationship with Twitter.

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Story Archive

Chelsea Handler's latest book is Life Will Be the Death of Me...and You Too! Emily Shur hide caption

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Emily Shur

Michaela Coel writes, directs and stars in I May Destroy You on HBO. Laura Radford/HBO hide caption

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Laura Radford/HBO

Summer Pop Culture Recs, Plus A Visit With Kirk Franklin

It's summer without a lot of the usual summer fun because, you know, pandemic. But we've got music and TV recommendations to keep you company. Joining Sam are All Things Considered co-host Audie Cornish and Code Switch co-host Gene Demby to chat about their TV picks — Netflix's Bojack Horseman and HBO's I May Destroy You — and to play a special summer songs version of Who Said That. Then, Sam chats with gospel musician, songwriter and author Kirk Franklin about how his music and faith are a balm for these turbulent times.

Summer Pop Culture Recs, Plus A Visit With Kirk Franklin

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A Black Mother Reflects On Giving Her 3 Sons 'The Talk' ... Again And Again

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Twitter headquarters in San Francisco, California. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

How Much Have Facebook And Twitter Changed Since 2016?

How much has Big Tech changed since the 2016 election? Sam is joined by Washington Post tech reporters Elizabeth Dwoskin and Tony Romm. They chat about Facebook and Twitter and how their platforms and views on free speech have evolved since the last presidential election. Sam also chats with Washington Post columnist and satirist Alexandra Petri about her book of essays Nothing Is Wrong and Here Is Why and how she uses humor to uncover bigger truths.

How Much Have Facebook And Twitter Changed Since 2016?

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Author James McBride Sees Hope In Recent Activism For Racial Justice

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Tracee Ellis Ross as music superstar Grace Davis in the film The High Note. Glen WIlson/Focus Features hide caption

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Glen WIlson/Focus Features

A protester in Brooklyn with a face mask saying Defund Police, June 7 2020. Erik McGregor/LightRocket via Getty Images hide caption

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Erik McGregor/LightRocket via Getty Images

Money And Justice

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Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) recipients celebrate in front of the Supreme Court after the Supreme Court rejected President Donald Trump's effort to end legal protections for young immigrants, Thursday, June 18, 2020, in Washington. Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP hide caption

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Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP

Supreme Court Protects Rights For DACA And LGBTQ Workers

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Author James McBride's new book is Deacon King Kong. Chia Messina hide caption

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Chia Messina

LONDON, ENGLAND - JUNE 12: Black Lives Matter supporters are seen on the roof of a van during a rally in Trafalgar Square on June 12, 2020 in London, United Kingdom. (Photo by Peter Summers/Getty Images) Peter Summers/Getty Images hide caption

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Lessons About Racism from 'Cops' and 'Gone With The Wind'

The killing of George Floyd has inspired global protests against police brutality, and it seems like everyone has something to say, including the entertainment industry. Sam's joined by NPR television critic Eric Deggans and Tonya Mosley, co-host of NPR/WBUR's Here & Now and host of the KQED podcast Truth Be Told. They talk about the cancellation of the long-running reality TV show Cops, the removal of Gone With the Wind from HBO Max, and what it all says about this moment. After that, Sam chats with Rev. Jacqui Lewis, senior minister at Middle Collegiate Church in Manhattan, and Rev. angel Kyodo williams, a Zen priest. They talk about what Black people and white people should be doing differently now and give Sam a bit of sermon.

Lessons About Racism from 'Cops' and 'Gone With The Wind'

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Republican Party members wave placards bearing the name 'Nixon', in support of Richard Nixon, at the 1968 Republican National Convention, in Miami Beach, Florida. Archive Photos/Getty Images hide caption

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Archive Photos/Getty Images

Demonstrators raise their fists in downtown Los Angeles on June 3, during a protest over the death of George Floyd. Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP hide caption

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Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP

Not Just Another Protest

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After Retooling Because Of COVID-19, 'Patriot Act' Returns To Netflix

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Hasan Minhaj hosts Patriot Act on Netflix. Mark Seliger/Netflix hide caption

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Mark Seliger/Netflix