Sam Sanders Sam Sanders is a correspondent and host of It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders.
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Sam Sanders

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Sam
Josh Huskin/NPR

Sam Sanders

Correspondent and Host, It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

Sam Sanders is a correspondent and host of It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders at NPR. In the show, Sanders engages with journalists, actors, musicians, and listeners to gain the kind of understanding about news and popular culture that can only be reached through conversation. The podcast releases two episodes each week: a "deep dive" interview on Tuesdays, as well as a Friday wrap of the week's news.

Previously, as a key member of NPR's election unit, Sam covered the intersection of culture, pop culture, and politics in the 2016 election, and embedded with the Bernie Sanders campaign for several months. He was also one of the original co-hosts of NPR's Politics Podcast, which launched in 2015.

Sanders joined NPR in 2009 as a Kroc Fellow, and since then has worn many hats within the organization, including field producer and breaking news reporter. He's spent time at three Member stations as well: WUNC in North Carolina, Oregon Public Broadcasting, and WBUR in Boston, as an intern for On Point.

Sanders graduated from the Harvard Kennedy School in 2009 with a master's degree in public policy, with a focus on media and politics. He received his undergraduate degree from the University of the Incarnate Word in San Antonio, Texas, with a double major in political science and music.

In his free time, Sanders runs, eats bacon, and continues his love/hate relationship with Twitter.

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Story Archive

James McBride attends The Miami Book Fair at Miami Dade College Wolfson - Chapman Conference Center on November 16, 2017 in Miami, Florida. Johnny Louis/WireImage hide caption

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Johnny Louis/WireImage

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Tara Moore/Getty Images

Presenting Life Kit: How To Have Better Conversations

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Georgia State welcome sign at rest stop near Georgia border. Marje/Getty Images hide caption

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Georgia's Senate Runoffs, Plus W. Kamau Bell and Hari Kondabolu Talk Politics

Georgia's Senate runoffs have become national races as control of the Senate depends on who wins. Sam asks Tia Mitchell, Washington correspondent for the Atlanta Journal-Constitution, if Georgia voters are looking at the runoffs the way the rest of the country is. Then, Sam chats with comedians W. Kamau Bell and Hari Kondabolu, hosts of the podcast "Politically Re-Active", about how the Left is processing the results of the 2020 election.

Georgia's Senate Runoffs, Plus W. Kamau Bell and Hari Kondabolu Talk Politics

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Then President-elect Donald Trump speaks as one of his attorneys stands by during a news conference on Jan. 11, 2017, at Trump Tower in New York. Seth Wenig/AP hide caption

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Seth Wenig/AP

Why Donald Trump Is The Houdini Of Bad Business

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President-elect Joe Biden waves as he leaves The Queen theater, Tuesday, Nov. 10, 2020, in Wilmington, Del. Carolyn Kaster/AP hide caption

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Carolyn Kaster/AP

Biden's Coronavirus Response, Plus Comedian Matt Rogers

What could a new president mean for the coronavirus pandemic? Sam talks to Ed Yong, staff writer at The Atlantic, about President-elect Joe Biden's coronavirus task force and how much the federal government can do to change the course of the pandemic. Then, Sam chats with comedian Matt Rogers, whose projects this year include competition show Haute Dog on HBO Max, Quibi's Gayme Show and the podcast Las Culturistas (which he hosts with SNL's Bowen Yang). They talk about pop culture and what's giving them joy in 2020.

Biden's Coronavirus Response, Plus Comedian Matt Rogers

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Talia Lavin infiltrated white supremacist online groups for more than a year to research her book Culture Warlords: My Journey into the Dark Web of White Supremacy. Courtesy of Talia Lavin hide caption

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Courtesy of Talia Lavin

White Supremacy And Its Online Reach

Talia Lavin went undercover in white supremacist online communities, creating fake personas that would gain her access to the dark reaches of the internet normally off-limits to her, a Jewish woman. That research laid the groundwork for her book, Culture Warlords: My Journey Into the Dark Web of White Supremacy. Lavin talks to Sam about what it was like to infiltrate those online spaces, what she learned, and how white supremacy cannot exist without anti-Semitism.

White Supremacy And Its Online Reach

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Zhanon Morales, 30, during a rally outside the Pennsylvania Convention Center, Thursday, Nov. 5, 2020. Rebecca Blackwell/AP hide caption

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Rebecca Blackwell/AP

What's Next For Biden And Democrats?

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