Tom Dreisbach Tom Dreisbach is a correspondent on NPR's Investigations team focusing on breaking news stories.
Tom Dreisbach
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Tom Dreisbach

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Tom Dreisbach
Allison Shelley/NPR

Tom Dreisbach

Correspondent, Investigations

Tom Dreisbach is a correspondent on NPR's Investigations team focusing on breaking news stories.

His reporting on issues like COVID-19 scams and immigration detention has sparked federal investigations and has been cited by members of congress. Earlier, Dreisbach was a producer and editor for NPR's Embedded, where his work examined how opioids helped cause an HIV outbreak in Indiana, the role of video evidence in police shootings and the controversial development of Donald Trump's Southern California golf club. In 2018, he was awarded a national Edward R. Murrow Award from RTDNA. Prior to Embedded, Dreisbach was an editor for All Things Considered, NPR's flagship afternoon news show.

Story Archive

Police hold back rioters gathered outside the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6. New body camera footage released by the Justice Department shows the violence of that day from the perspective of the officers themselves. Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images

Attorney Bruce Castor represented former President Donald Trump at his Senate trial after the House of Representatives impeached Trump for the second time. Castor is now defending two people facing misdemeanor charges related to the Jan. 6 U.S. Capitol riot. Senate Television via AP hide caption

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Senate Television via AP

Trump Impeachment Lawyers Are Now Representing Capitol Riot Defendants

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A U.S. Capitol Police officer stands guard outside the Capitol ahead of the inauguration for President Biden on Jan. 20. Yegor Aleyev/Tass via Getty Images hide caption

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Yegor Aleyev/Tass via Getty Images

'The Worst I've Seen': Capitol Police Face Scrutiny For Lack Of Transparency

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The Department of Justice released videos depicting the alleged assault on Capitol Police Officer Brian Sicknick and other members of law enforcement during the Jan. 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol. Department of Justice/NPR hide caption

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Department of Justice/NPR

In this 2017 photo, Gavin McInnes (center), founder of the far-right extremist group known as the Proud Boys, is surrounded by supporters after speaking at a rally in Berkeley, Calif. McInnes told NPR that the group is made up of "funny dudes, not Nazis." At least 25 members of the far-right group are facing charges related to the Jan. 6 attack on the Capitol. Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP hide caption

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Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP

How Extremists Weaponize Irony To Spread Hate

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More Charges Expected In Investigation Into Capitol Riot

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Pro-Trump rioters, including members of the far-right extremist group the Proud Boys, gather near the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6. At least 25 people charged in the attack appear to have links to the Proud Boys, according to court documents. Jon Cherry/Getty Images hide caption

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Jon Cherry/Getty Images

Conspiracy Charges Bring Proud Boys' History Of Violence Into Spotlight

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The FBI started investigating UCLA student Christian Secor in late January, after receiving tips about his alleged involvement in the U.S. Capitol riot. This surveillance photo of Secor is cited in the government's application for a search warrant. Department of Justice hide caption

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Department of Justice

Alex Jones addresses a pro-Trump crowd on Jan. 6, the day of the U.S. Capitol riot. Jones is widely known for his support of baseless and often bigoted conspiracy theories, and he has been banned from many tech platforms, though not Amazon. Jon Cherry/Getty Images hide caption

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Jon Cherry/Getty Images

Alex Jones Still Sells Supplements On Amazon Despite Bans From Other Platforms

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Pro-Trump extremists clashed with police during the storming of the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6. The rioters may not have fired shots, but many were armed with other weapons, court documents show. Joseph Prezioso/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Joseph Prezioso/AFP via Getty Images

Yes, Capitol Rioters Were Armed. Here Are The Weapons Prosecutors Say They Used

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A college student charged in the Jan. 6 riot "openly posted calls for America to become a whites-only nation," according to the FBI. Who was he on campus? Yifan Wu for NPR hide caption

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Yifan Wu for NPR

UCLA Student Charged In Capitol Riot Took Inspiration From Online Extremist

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Federal prosecutors allege Leo Brent Bozell IV took part in the rioting at the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6. The government says it identified him through his blue sweatshirt, which featured the logo for a small Christian school in Pennsylvania that witnesses say his children attended. U.S. Department of Justice hide caption

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U.S. Department of Justice