Tom Dreisbach Tom Dreisbach is a correspondent on NPR's Investigations team focusing on breaking news stories.
Tom Dreisbach
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Tom Dreisbach

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Tom Dreisbach
Allison Shelley/NPR

Tom Dreisbach

Correspondent, Investigations

Tom Dreisbach is a correspondent on NPR's Investigations team focusing on breaking news stories.

His reporting on issues like COVID-19 scams and immigration detention has sparked federal investigations and has been cited by members of congress. Earlier, Dreisbach was a producer and editor for NPR's Embedded, where his work examined how opioids helped cause an HIV outbreak in Indiana, the role of video evidence in police shootings and the controversial development of Donald Trump's Southern California golf club. In 2018, he was awarded a national Edward R. Murrow Award from RTDNA. Prior to Embedded, Dreisbach was an editor for All Things Considered, NPR's flagship afternoon news show.

Story Archive

FBI agents document evidence outside a bureau field office in Kenwood, Ohio, on Aug. 11, after an armed man tried to breach the building. He fled and was later killed by law enforcement, authorities said. WKEF/WRGT via AP hide caption

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WKEF/WRGT via AP

An armed man was killed after trying to breach an Ohio FBI office

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Federal judge Dabney Friedrich castigated Capitol riot defendant Brandon Straka for making, in her view, "questionable" comments about his case in public since his sentencing. John Minchillo/AP hide caption

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John Minchillo/AP

Attorney Cleta Mitchell is a senior legal fellow with the nonprofit Conservative Partnership Institute in Washington, D.C. The group has hosted "Election Integrity" summits in key states around the country, which have featured speakers from the Republican National Committee. Matt Rourke/AP hide caption

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Matt Rourke/AP

What leaked audio tells us about Trump-linked "election integrity" efforts

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A tweet by former President Donald Trump appears on screen during a House Select Committee hearing to investigate the Jan. 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol. Court documents reveal this tweet drew rioters to Washington, D.C., that day. Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images

Today's Jan. 6 hearing looked at the role of Q-Anon, Proud Boys and Oath Keepers

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The congressional committee investigating the Jan. 6, 2021 attack on the Capitol will focus on the role of QAnon and extremist groups like the Oath Keepers and Proud Boys in its upcoming hearing. Prosecutors have identified the man at the center of this photograph as a QAnon-supporter named Douglas Jensen. Jensen has pleaded not guilty to all charges. Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP hide caption

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Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP

The Jan. 6 committee will focus on extremist groups in its next hearing

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The 1st Jan. 6 hearing put a spotlight on the Proud Boys' involvement in the attack

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Timothy Hale-Cusanelli of New Jersey was found guilty on all five criminal counts he was charged with. Hale-Cusanelli breached the U.S. Capitol building on Jan. 6, 2021, though he did not assault police or commit property damage that day. Julio Cortez/AP hide caption

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Julio Cortez/AP

Alleged 'Nazi sympathizer' testifies in his own defense in Capitol riot trial

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Prosecutors allege that Timothy Hale-Cusanelli is a white supremacist who breached the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6, 2021 intent on causing a second "civil war." His defense attorney contends that Hale-Cusanelli frequently makes "bombastic" statements and uses "offensive" language, but that he entered the Capitol as a result of "groupthink." Jose Luis Magana/AP hide caption

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Jose Luis Magana/AP

Dinesh D'Souza, seen here at a premiere of one of his films in 2018, has released a new film alleging voter fraud in the 2020 presidential election. Fact checkers have cast doubt on many of the film's claims. Shannon Finney/Getty Images hide caption

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Shannon Finney/Getty Images

A pro-Trump film suggests its data are so accurate, it solved a murder. That's false

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