Selena Simmons-Duffin Selena Simmons-Duffin reports on health policy for NPR.
Selena Simmons-Duffin
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Selena Simmons-Duffin

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Selena Simmons-Duffin
Olivia Falcigno/NPR

Selena Simmons-Duffin

Reporter

Selena Simmons-Duffin reports on health policy for NPR.

She has worked at NPR for ten years as a show editor and producer, with one stopover at WAMU in 2017 as part of a staff exchange. For four months, she reported local Washington, DC, health stories, including a secretive maternity ward closure and a gesundheit machine.

Before coming to All Things Considered in 2016, Simmons-Duffin spent six years on Morning Edition working shifts at all hours and directing the show. She also drove the full length of the U.S.-Mexico border in 2014 for the "Borderland" series.

She won a Gracie Award in 2015 for creating a video called "Talking While Female," and a 2014 AAAS Kavli Science Journalism Award for producing a series on why you should love your microbes.

Simmons-Duffin attended Stanford University, where she majored in English. She took time off from college to do HIV/AIDS-related work in East Africa. She started out in radio at Stanford's radio station, KZSU, and went on to study documentary radio at the Salt Institute, before coming to NPR as an intern in 2009.

She lives in Washington, DC, with her spouse and kids.

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Bridget Desmukes (center) and her husband, Jeffrey, love having a big, active family. "The kids are always climbing on things, flipping all the time — it's not dull," she says, laughing. Because Desmukes had developed preeclampsia in a previous pregnancy, her OB-GYN recommended low-dose aspirin at her first prenatal appointment this past spring. Ryan Kellman/NPR hide caption

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Ryan Kellman/NPR

A Daily Baby Aspirin Could Help Many Pregnancies And Save Lives

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Researchers surveyed people about their happy childhood memories and found that those who had more were much less likely to experience depression later in life. IvanJekic/Getty Images hide caption

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Positive Childhood Experiences May Buffer Against Health Effects Of Adverse Ones

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Dr. Peter Grinspoon was a practicing physician when he became addicted to opioids. When he got caught, Grinspoon wasn't allowed access to what's now the standard treatment for addiction — buprenorphine or methadone (in addition to counseling) — precisely because he was a doctor. /Tony Luong for NPR hide caption

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/Tony Luong for NPR

For Health Workers Struggling With Addiction, Why Are Treatment Options Limited?

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Treatment Limitations For Physicians With Opioid Addictions

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A Look At The Costs From The Opioid Epidemic

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State's attorney Brad Beckworth lays out one of his closing arguments in Oklahoma's case against drugmaker Johnson & Johnson at the Cleveland County Courthouse in Norman, Okla. in July. The judge in the case ruled Monday that J&J must pay $572 million to the state. Chris Landsberger/AP hide caption

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Chris Landsberger/AP

Oklahoma Wanted $17 Billion To Fight Its Opioid Crisis: What's The Real Cost?

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Nationally, drug overdose deaths reached record levels in 2017, when a group protested in New York City on Overdose Awareness Day on August 31. Deaths appear to have declined slightly in 2018, based on provisional numbers, but nearly 68,000 people still died. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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The Trump administration has suggested buying a prescription drug is like buying a car — with plenty of room to negotiate down from the sticker price. But drug pricing analysts say the analogy doesn't work. tomeng/Getty Images hide caption

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How Does Drug Pricing Work? Hint: It's More Like Designer Handbags Than Cars

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Secretary of Health and Human Services Alex Azar announced his agency is dropping a proposal intended to lower drug prices. Michael Brochstein/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images hide caption

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Michael Brochstein/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

President Trump signed an executive order Wednesday proposing to change how kidney disease is treated in the United States. It encourages in-home dialysis and more kidney donations. Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Trump Administration Announces Plans To Shake Up The Kidney Care Industry

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The Affordable Care Act Is On Trial Again — This Time In Louisiana

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