Selena Simmons-Duffin Selena Simmons-Duffin reports on health policy for NPR.
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Selena Simmons-Duffin

Demonstrators outside PhRMA headquarters in Washington, D.C., protest lobbying by pharmaceutical companies to keep Medicare from negotiating lower prescription drug prices. Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images

Senate to vote on huge package that would change drug pricing and health insurance

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Ana Elsy Ramirez Diaz holds her baby as he is seen by Dr. Margaret-Anne Fernandez during a checkup visit at INOVA Cares Clinic for Children in Falls Church, Va. A portion of the clinic's patients are insured through the Children's Health Insurance Program. Matt McClain/The Washington Post via Getty Images hide caption

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Matt McClain/The Washington Post via Getty Images

Millions of kids qualify for Medicaid. Biden funds outreach to boost enrollment

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Dr. Kara Beasley protests the overturning of Roe vs. Wade by the U.S. Supreme Court, in Denver, Colorado on June 24, 2022. JASON CONNOLLY/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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JASON CONNOLLY/AFP via Getty Images

Doctors weren't considered in Dobbs, but now they're on abortion's legal front lines

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Tracy Lee for NPR

For doctors, abortion restrictions create an 'impossible choice' when providing care

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A mother holds her 1-year-old son as he receives the child Covid-19 vaccine in his thigh at Temple Beth Shalom in Needham, Mass., on June 21, 2022. The temple was one of the first sites in the state to offer vaccinations to anyone in the public. Joseph Prezioso/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Joseph Prezioso/AFP via Getty Images

The U.S. Supreme Court ruled in an abortion case this week. The court's conservative justices are overturning Roe v. Wade. Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images hide caption

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Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images

Abortion access questions, asked and answered

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People walk past a COVID testing site on May 17 in New York City. New York's health commissioner, Dr. Ashwin Vasan, has moved from a "medium" COVID-19 alert level to a "high" alert level in all the five boroughs following a surge in cases. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images
Koko Nakajima/NPR

This is how many lives could have been saved with COVID vaccinations in each state

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People of every age, race and class in every state get abortions

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Rachel Levine, U.S. assistant secretary for health, says, "The language of medicine and science is being used to drive people to suicide." Political attacks against trans young people are on the rise across the country. Caroline Brehman-Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Caroline Brehman-Pool/Getty Images

Rachel Levine calls state anti-LGBTQ bills disturbing and dangerous to trans youth

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Jerome Adams, who served as Trump's U.S. surgeon general, says he hopes that coming out of the pandemic, people can have a healthier respect for the scientific process. Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images