Selena Simmons-Duffin Selena Simmons-Duffin reports on health policy for NPR.
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Selena Simmons-Duffin

What To Do If You Just Lost Health Insurance With Your Job

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Aetna was the first insurer to announce its plan to help shield patients with COVID-19 from high medical bills. But out-of-network charges and other surprise bills remain a risk, say advocates for patients. Michael Nagle/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Michael Nagle/Bloomberg via Getty Images

What's In The $2 Trillion Bill For Health Care?

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Doctors test a hospital staffer Tuesday for coronavirus, in a triage tent that's been set up outside the E.R. at St. Barnabas hospital in the Bronx. Hospital workers are at higher risk of getting COVID-19, and public health experts fear a staffing shortage in the U.S. is coming. Misha Friedman/Getty Images hide caption

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Misha Friedman/Getty Images

States Get Creative To Find And Deploy More Health Workers In COVID-19 Fight

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A vehicle enters a Canadian border station at the U.S./Canada border after the two countries closed their border for all non-essential travel in Lansdowne, Ontario, on March 22, 2020. Lars Hagberg/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Lars Hagberg/AFP via Getty Images

MedStar Washington Hospital Center's "ready room" in Washington, D.C., has mostly been used to house emergency supplies — but some storage carts have been moved out to make way for patient assessment stations. Ryan Kellman/NPR hide caption

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Ryan Kellman/NPR

Are U.S. Hospitals Ready?

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What U.S. Hospitals Must Do To Prepare For The COVID-19 Surge

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Early symptoms of COVID-19 are much the same as those of the flu or a cold. Don't panic. Call your doctor to check in, if you're worried, but treating mild or moderate symptoms at home until you're well will protect you and help stop the spread of whatever you have. Guido Mieth/Getty Images hide caption

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Guido Mieth/Getty Images

You Have A Fever And A Dry Cough. Now What?

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President Trump signs an $8.3 billion emergency spending bill in the White House Friday. That's significantly more than he originally requested from Congress. Jim Lo Scalzo/EPA/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Jim Lo Scalzo/EPA/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Where That $8.3 Billion In U.S. Coronavirus Funding Will And Won't Go

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Vice President Mike Pence leads a press briefing along with members of the Coronavirus Task Force formed by the White House in response to the outbreak. Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post via Getty Images hide caption

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Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post via Getty Images

Public Trust In Health Authorities Is Key To Fighting Coronavirus — Is It At Risk?

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During A Disease Outbreak, Public Trust In Government Officials Is Crucial

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Supporters of LGBTQ rights took to the street in a demonstration in front of the U.S. Supreme Court last October. Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP hide caption

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Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP

'Whiplash' Of LGBTQ Protections And Rights, From Obama To Trump

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The Latest On The Coronavirus Outbreak: At Least 1 Patient Dies In The U.S.

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