Selena Simmons-Duffin Selena Simmons-Duffin reports on health policy for NPR.
Selena Simmons-Duffin
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Selena Simmons-Duffin

Olivia Falcigno/NPR
Selena Simmons-Duffin
Olivia Falcigno/NPR

Selena Simmons-Duffin

Reporter

Selena Simmons-Duffin reports on health policy for NPR.

She has worked at NPR for ten years as a show editor and producer, with one stopover at WAMU in 2017 as part of a staff exchange. For four months, she reported local Washington, DC, health stories, including a secretive maternity ward closure and a gesundheit machine.

Before coming to All Things Considered in 2016, Simmons-Duffin spent six years on Morning Edition working shifts at all hours and directing the show. She also drove the full length of the U.S.-Mexico border in 2014 for the "Borderland" series.

She won a Gracie Award in 2015 for creating a video called "Talking While Female," and a 2014 AAAS Kavli Science Journalism Award for producing a series on why you should love your microbes.

Simmons-Duffin attended Stanford University, where she majored in English. She took time off from college to do HIV/AIDS-related work in East Africa. She started out in radio at Stanford's radio station, KZSU, and went on to study documentary radio at the Salt Institute, before coming to NPR as an intern in 2009.

She lives in Washington, DC, with her spouse and kids.

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CDC Panel To Vote On Who's 1st In Line For COVID-19 Vaccine

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How Thanksgiving Travel Will Impact Coronavirus Numbers

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Trump Pushes Through Policy Changes And Staffing Appointments In Last Days In Office

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Federal Data Show Growing Hospital Staff Shortages Across The U.S.

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The Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine needs to be stored at minus 70 Celsius. Health care providers will need to store it either in dry ice for shorter stints or in specialized freezers. Leon Neal/Getty Images hide caption

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Leon Neal/Getty Images

Why Does Pfizer's COVID-19 Vaccine Need To Be Kept Colder Than Antarctica?

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Despite Encouraging Pfizer News, Widespread Vaccination Is Months Away

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Joe Biden rallied supporters Wednesday, Nov. 4, in Wilmington, Del. Though he is now U.S. president-elect, Biden will have to await outcomes of January run-off races in the Senate to know much support he's likely to get there for his health care agenda. Paul Sancya/AP hide caption

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Paul Sancya/AP

The ICU at Tampa General Hospital in Tampa, Fla., was 99% full this week, according to an internal report produced by the federal government. It's among numerous hospitals the report highlighted with ICUs filled to over 90% capacity. Michael S. Williamson/The Washington Post via Getty Images hide caption

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Michael S. Williamson/The Washington Post via Getty Images

Internal Documents Reveal COVID-19 Hospitalization Data The Government Keeps Hidden

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President Trump has promised at campaign rallies to protect patients with preexisting conditions, but he has not explained how he plans to do that. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP

President Trump announced a partnership with two national pharmacy chains to administer coronavirus vaccines to nursing homes at an event in Fort Myers, Fla. Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images

While coronavirus vaccine trials are ongoing and a U.S. vaccine has yet to be approved, state health officials are planning ahead for how to eventually immunize a large swath of the population. Chandan Khanna/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Chandan Khanna/AFP via Getty Images

Facing Many Unknowns, States Rush To Plan Distribution Of COVID-19 Vaccines

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