Selena Simmons-Duffin Selena Simmons-Duffin reports on health policy for NPR.
Selena Simmons-Duffin
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Selena Simmons-Duffin

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Selena Simmons-Duffin
Wanyu Zhang/NPR

Selena Simmons-Duffin

Reporter/Producer

Selena Simmons-Duffin reports on health policy for NPR.

She has worked at NPR for ten years as a show editor and producer, with one stopover at WAMU in 2017 as part of a staff exchange. For four months, she reported local Washington, DC, health stories, including a secretive maternity ward closure and a gesundheit machine.

Before coming to All Things Considered in 2016, Simmons-Duffin spent six years on Morning Edition working shifts at all hours and directing the show. She also drove the full length of the U.S.-Mexico border in 2014 for the "Borderland" series.

She won a Gracie Award in 2015 for creating a video called "Talking While Female," and a 2014 AAAS Kavli Science Journalism Award for producing a series on why you should love your microbes.

Simmons-Duffin attended Stanford University, where she majored in English. She took time off from college to do HIV/AIDS-related work in East Africa. She started out in radio at Stanford's radio station, KZSU, and went on to study documentary radio at the Salt Institute, before coming to NPR as an intern in 2009.

She lives in Washington, DC, with her spouse and kids.

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Nationally, drug overdose deaths reached record levels in 2017, when a group protested in New York City on Overdose Awareness Day on August 31. Deaths appear to have declined slightly in 2018, based on provisional numbers, but nearly 68,000 people still died. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

The Trump administration has suggested buying a prescription drug is like buying a car — with plenty of room to negotiate down from the sticker price. But drug pricing analysts say the analogy doesn't work. tomeng/Getty Images hide caption

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tomeng/Getty Images

How Does Drug Pricing Work? Hint: It's More Like Designer Handbags Than Cars

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Secretary of Health and Human Services Alex Azar announced his agency is dropping a proposal intended to lower drug prices. Michael Brochstein/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images hide caption

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Michael Brochstein/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

President Trump signed an executive order Wednesday proposing to change how kidney disease is treated in the United States. It encourages in-home dialysis and more kidney donations. Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images

Trump Administration Announces Plans To Shake Up The Kidney Care Industry

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The Affordable Care Act Is On Trial Again — This Time In Louisiana

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Texas To Ask Federal Appeals Court To Pull The Plug On Obamacare

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A Trump administration rule has been delayed by courts. It was intended to protect health care workers who refuse to be involved in procedures they object to for moral or religious reasons. thelinke/Getty Images hide caption

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Dr. Rebekah Gee, secretary of the Louisiana Department of Health, negotiated a deal with a drugmaker to get the state a better price for expensive hepatitis C medications for its Medicaid and prison populations. Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call Inc. hide caption

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Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call Inc.

Daisha Smith says she only realized she had been sued over her hospital bill when she saw her paycheck was being garnished. "I literally have no food in my house because they're garnishing my check," she says. Olivia Falcigno/NPR hide caption

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Olivia Falcigno/NPR

When Hospitals Sue For Unpaid Bills, It Can Be 'Ruinous' For Patients

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The executive order on drug price transparency that President Trump signed Monday doesn't spell out specific actions; rather, it directs the department of Health and Human Services to develop a policy and then undertake a lengthy rule-making process. Carolyn Kaster/AP hide caption

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Carolyn Kaster/AP

Trump Administration Pushes To Make Health Care Pricing More Transparent

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Gov. Ron DeSantis signed Florida's prescription drug importation program into law last week at The Villages, a large retirement community outside Orlando. Florida Governor's Press Office hide caption

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Florida Governor's Press Office

Florida Wants To Import Medicine From Canada. But How Would That Work?

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Rural Health: Financial Insecurity Plagues Many Who Live With Disability

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'Patients Will Die': One County's Challenge To Trump's 'Conscience Rights' Rule

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Jake Powell, who works in New York City, is originally from Wyoming. Powell joined the PrEP4All movement after having to go off the drug for six months because it was too costly, even for someone with health insurance. Courtesy of Brandon Cuicchi hide caption

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Courtesy of Brandon Cuicchi

AIDS Activists Take Aim At Gilead To Lower Price Of HIV Drug PrEP

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