Selena Simmons-Duffin Selena Simmons-Duffin reports on health policy for NPR.
Selena Simmons-Duffin
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Selena Simmons-Duffin

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Selena Simmons-Duffin
Olivia Falcigno/NPR

Selena Simmons-Duffin

Reporter

Selena Simmons-Duffin reports on health policy for NPR.

She has worked at NPR for ten years as a show editor and producer, with one stopover at WAMU in 2017 as part of a staff exchange. For four months, she reported local Washington, DC, health stories, including a secretive maternity ward closure and a gesundheit machine.

Before coming to All Things Considered in 2016, Simmons-Duffin spent six years on Morning Edition working shifts at all hours and directing the show. She also drove the full length of the U.S.-Mexico border in 2014 for the "Borderland" series.

She won a Gracie Award in 2015 for creating a video called "Talking While Female," and a 2014 AAAS Kavli Science Journalism Award for producing a series on why you should love your microbes.

Simmons-Duffin attended Stanford University, where she majored in English. She took time off from college to do HIV/AIDS-related work in East Africa. She started out in radio at Stanford's radio station, KZSU, and went on to study documentary radio at the Salt Institute, before coming to NPR as an intern in 2009.

She lives in Washington, DC, with her spouse and kids.

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Story Archive

Summer Colds Are Back — Here's How To Keep From Getting Sick

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5 Ways To Stop Summer Colds From Making The Rounds In Your Family

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COVID Precautions Can Help Kids During Cold Season

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In 2020, many state and local health departments ramped up hiring staff to do contact tracing. Joseph Ortiz was working as a contact tracer in New York City last summer. John Minchillo/AP hide caption

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John Minchillo/AP

Why Contact Tracing Couldn't Keep Up With The U.S. COVID Outbreak

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How Contact Tracing Has Changed Since COVID-19

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After the CDC shifted this week to less restrictive mask guidance for people who have been fully vaccinated against COVID-19, some leaders in the public health world felt blindsided. While some people rejoiced, others say they feel the change has come too soon. Ben Hasty/MediaNews Group via Getty Images hide caption

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Ben Hasty/MediaNews Group via Getty Images

The headquarters of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta. Ron Harris/AP hide caption

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Ron Harris/AP

Poll Finds Public Health Has A Trust Problem

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The Biden administration says the government will protect gay and transgender people against sex discrimination in health care. In this 2017 photo, Equality March for Unity and Pride participants march past the White House in Washington. Carolyn Kaster/AP hide caption

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Carolyn Kaster/AP

U.S. Will Protect Gay And Transgender People Against Discrimination In Health Care

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The Biden administration launched Vaccines.gov on Friday to try to help people find COVID-19 vaccines near them. Selena Simmons-Duffin/NPR hide caption

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Selena Simmons-Duffin/NPR

Biden Administration Is Making Health Insurance Cheaper, Easier To Entice Enrollees

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Health Panel's Emergency Meeting Considers Status Of J&J Vaccine

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The Biden administration has opened up enrollment on all Affordable Care Act marketplaces, including on the federal insurance exchange, Healthcare.gov, until August. Many people will qualify for better or less expensive plans — or both. Healthcare.gov/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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Healthcare.gov/Screenshot by NPR

The FDA said Wednesday that Abbott's BinaxNow test and Quidel's QuickVue can now be sold without a prescription for consumers to test themselves at home. Ted S. Warren/AP hide caption

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Ted S. Warren/AP

FDA Authorizes 2 Rapid, At-Home Coronavirus Tests

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Biden Defends His Response To Migrants At The Border And COVID-19 In Press Conference

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