Selena Simmons-Duffin Selena Simmons-Duffin reports on health policy for NPR.
Selena Simmons-Duffin
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Selena Simmons-Duffin

Olivia Falcigno/NPR
Selena Simmons-Duffin
Olivia Falcigno/NPR

Selena Simmons-Duffin

Reporter

Selena Simmons-Duffin reports on health policy for NPR.

She has worked at NPR for ten years as a show editor and producer, with one stopover at WAMU in 2017 as part of a staff exchange. For four months, she reported local Washington, DC, health stories, including a secretive maternity ward closure and a gesundheit machine.

Before coming to All Things Considered in 2016, Simmons-Duffin spent six years on Morning Edition working shifts at all hours and directing the show. She also drove the full length of the U.S.-Mexico border in 2014 for the "Borderland" series.

She won a Gracie Award in 2015 for creating a video called "Talking While Female," and a 2014 AAAS Kavli Science Journalism Award for producing a series on why you should love your microbes.

Simmons-Duffin attended Stanford University, where she majored in English. She took time off from college to do HIV/AIDS-related work in East Africa. She started out in radio at Stanford's radio station, KZSU, and went on to study documentary radio at the Salt Institute, before coming to NPR as an intern in 2009.

She lives in Washington, DC, with her spouse and kids.

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Story Archive

What's In The $2 Trillion Bill For Health Care?

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Doctors test a hospital staffer Tuesday for coronavirus, in a triage tent that's been set up outside the E.R. at St. Barnabas hospital in the Bronx. Hospital workers are at higher risk of getting COVID-19, and public health experts fear a staffing shortage in the U.S. is coming. Misha Friedman/Getty Images hide caption

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Misha Friedman/Getty Images

States Get Creative To Find And Deploy More Health Workers In COVID-19 Fight

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A vehicle enters a Canadian border station at the U.S./Canada border after the two countries closed their border for all non-essential travel in Lansdowne, Ontario, on March 22, 2020. Lars Hagberg/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Lars Hagberg/AFP via Getty Images

MedStar Washington Hospital Center's "ready room" in Washington, D.C., has mostly been used to house emergency supplies — but some storage carts have been moved out to make way for patient assessment stations. Ryan Kellman/NPR hide caption

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Ryan Kellman/NPR

Are U.S. Hospitals Ready?

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What U.S. Hospitals Must Do To Prepare For The COVID-19 Surge

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Early symptoms of COVID-19 are much the same as those of the flu or a cold. Don't panic. Call your doctor to check in, if you're worried, but treating mild or moderate symptoms at home until you're well will protect you and help stop the spread of whatever you have. Guido Mieth/Getty Images hide caption

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Guido Mieth/Getty Images

You Have A Fever And A Dry Cough. Now What?

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President Trump signs an $8.3 billion emergency spending bill in the White House Friday. That's significantly more than he originally requested from Congress. Jim Lo Scalzo/EPA/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Jim Lo Scalzo/EPA/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Where That $8.3 Billion In U.S. Coronavirus Funding Will And Won't Go

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Vice President Mike Pence leads a press briefing along with members of the Coronavirus Task Force formed by the White House in response to the outbreak. Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post via Getty Images hide caption

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Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post via Getty Images

Public Trust In Health Authorities Is Key To Fighting Coronavirus — Is It At Risk?

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During A Disease Outbreak, Public Trust In Government Officials Is Crucial

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Supporters of LGBTQ rights took to the street in a demonstration in front of the U.S. Supreme Court last October. Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP hide caption

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Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP

'Whiplash' Of LGBTQ Protections And Rights, From Obama To Trump

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The Latest On The Coronavirus Outbreak: At Least 1 Patient Dies In The U.S.

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National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases Director Dr. Nancy Messonnier, speaks during a news conference in January. Messonnier on Friday defended the CDC's handling of a new coronavirus case in California. Samuel Corum/Getty Images hide caption

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Samuel Corum/Getty Images

Examining Trump Administration Aims To Change Disability Benefits

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A spoonful of honey makes the medicine...irrelevant. That's because honey works better than cough syrups to help with kids' coughs. But don't give honey to infants under one years old. Rachen Buosa/Getty Images/EyeEm hide caption

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Rachen Buosa/Getty Images/EyeEm

For Kid's Coughs, Swap The Over-The-Counter Syrups For Honey

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