Selena Simmons-Duffin Selena Simmons-Duffin reports on health policy for NPR.
Selena Simmons-Duffin
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Selena Simmons-Duffin

Olivia Falcigno/NPR
Selena Simmons-Duffin
Olivia Falcigno/NPR

Selena Simmons-Duffin

Reporter

Selena Simmons-Duffin reports on health policy for NPR.

She has worked at NPR for ten years as a show editor and producer, with one stopover at WAMU in 2017 as part of a staff exchange. For four months, she reported local Washington, DC, health stories, including a secretive maternity ward closure and a gesundheit machine.

Before coming to All Things Considered in 2016, Simmons-Duffin spent six years on Morning Edition working shifts at all hours and directing the show. She also drove the full length of the U.S.-Mexico border in 2014 for the "Borderland" series.

She won a Gracie Award in 2015 for creating a video called "Talking While Female," and a 2014 AAAS Kavli Science Journalism Award for producing a series on why you should love your microbes.

Simmons-Duffin attended Stanford University, where she majored in English. She took time off from college to do HIV/AIDS-related work in East Africa. She started out in radio at Stanford's radio station, KZSU, and went on to study documentary radio at the Salt Institute, before coming to NPR as an intern in 2009.

She lives in Washington, DC, with her spouse and kids.

Story Archive

Eligible Americans Can Now Get COVID-19 Booster Shots

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Getting vaccinated during pregnancy is one of the best ways to make sure your vulnerable newborn benefits from your antibodies to the coronavirus, doctors say. ©fitopardo/Getty Images hide caption

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©fitopardo/Getty Images

Babies, The Delta Variant And COVID: What Parents Need To Know

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The term "fetal heartbeat," as used in the new anti-abortion law in Texas, is misleading and not based on science, say physicians who specialize in reproductive health. What the ultrasound machine detects in an embryo at six weeks of pregnancy is actually just electrical activity from cells that aren't yet a heart. And the sound that you "hear" is actually manufactured by the ultrasound machine. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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The Texas Abortion Ban Hinges On 'Fetal Heartbeat.' Doctors Call That Misleading

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Demonstrators calling on people to wear masks gather outside school district headquarters in Marietta, Ga., last week. A recent review at pandemic data finds requiring masks, capping the size of gatherings and instituting certain bar, gym and restaurant restrictions are all strategies that can help stop a surge in COVID-19 hospitalizations. Mike Stewart/AP hide caption

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Mike Stewart/AP

Even Moderate COVID Restrictions Can Slow The Spread Of The Virus — If They're Timely

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A data scientist working in tech, Michael Donnelly became an amateur COVID-19 watcher early in the pandemic. When his vaccinated friends started getting sick following July Fourth festivities in Provincetown, Mass., he documented more than 50 breakthrough cases that ultimately led the CDC to changing its guidance on masking. Jason LeCras for NPR hide caption

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Jason LeCras for NPR

A Citizen Scientist Gave The CDC A Head Start In A COVID-19 Outbreak Investigation

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A special open enrollment period on all Affordable Care Act marketplaces, including on the federal insurance exchange, HealthCare.gov, runs until Aug. 15. Many people qualify for free or low-cost plans. HealthCare.gov/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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HealthCare.gov/Screenshot by NPR

Uninsured Or Unemployed? You Might Be Missing Out On Free Health Insurance

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Thirteen Million People In The U.S. Have Two Weeks To Apply For Free Health Insurance

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Front-line workers at a medical center in Aurora, Colo., gather for a COVID-19 memorial on July 15 to commemorate the lives lost in the coronavirus pandemic. New estimates say many thousands more will die in the U.S. this summer and fall. Hyoung Chang/MediaNews Group/Denver Post via Getty Images hide caption

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Hyoung Chang/MediaNews Group/Denver Post via Getty Images

With new infections rising around the country due to the delta variant, reports of breakthrough cases among the fully vaccinated can be worrisome. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images

New COVID-19 Cases Up 70%, Fueled By Delta Variant

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People enjoy an outdoor art exhibition in downtown Los Angeles in early July. Los Angeles County public health authorities are now urging unvaccinated and vaccinated people alike to wear face coverings in public indoor spaces because of the growing threat posed by the more contagious delta variant of the coronavirus. Robyn Beck/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Robyn Beck/AFP via Getty Images

Advocates for expanding Medicaid in Kansas staged a protest outside the entrance to the statehouse parking garage in Topeka in May 2019. Today, twelve states have still not expanded Medicaid. The biggest are Texas, Florida, and Georgia, but there are a few outside the South, including Wyoming and Kansas. John Hanna/AP hide caption

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John Hanna/AP

12 Holdout States Haven't Expanded Medicaid, Leaving 2 Million People In Limbo

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