Selena Simmons-Duffin Selena Simmons-Duffin reports on health policy for NPR.
Selena Simmons-Duffin
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Selena Simmons-Duffin

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Selena Simmons-Duffin
Olivia Falcigno/NPR

Selena Simmons-Duffin

Reporter

Selena Simmons-Duffin reports on health policy for NPR.

She has worked at NPR for ten years as a show editor and producer, with one stopover at WAMU in 2017 as part of a staff exchange. For four months, she reported local Washington, DC, health stories, including a secretive maternity ward closure and a gesundheit machine.

Before coming to All Things Considered in 2016, Simmons-Duffin spent six years on Morning Edition working shifts at all hours and directing the show. She also drove the full length of the U.S.-Mexico border in 2014 for the "Borderland" series.

She won a Gracie Award in 2015 for creating a video called "Talking While Female," and a 2014 AAAS Kavli Science Journalism Award for producing a series on why you should love your microbes.

Simmons-Duffin attended Stanford University, where she majored in English. She took time off from college to do HIV/AIDS-related work in East Africa. She started out in radio at Stanford's radio station, KZSU, and went on to study documentary radio at the Salt Institute, before coming to NPR as an intern in 2009.

She lives in Washington, DC, with her spouse and kids.

Story Archive

Dr. Matifadza Hlatshwayo Davis, who directs the St. Louis Department of Health, has turned to social media platforms this week and to local clergy and community groups — the sort of trusted messengers people turn to in times of uncertainty — to help get the right sort of early word out about the omicron variant. Conveying what's known and what's still to be learned are both important, she says. Brian Munoz/St. Louis Public Radio hide caption

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Brian Munoz/St. Louis Public Radio

Sending the right message about the omicron variant is tricky

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Public health messaging about omicron will be vital to curb conspiracy theories

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Subin Yang for NPR

How To Choose A Health Insurance Plan

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A nurse administers a COVID-19 vaccine to a nine-year-old child in Tustin, CA. Mark Rightmire/MediaNews Group via Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Rightmire/MediaNews Group via Getty Images

Parents, We're Here To Help! Answers To Your COVID Vaccine Questions

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Erica Cuellar, her husband and her daughter moved in with her father in his home early in the pandemic, after she lost her job. She and her husband were worried they wouldn't be able to afford the rent on their house in Houston with only one income. In July 2020, the whole family tested positive for the coronavirus. Michael Starghill for NPR hide caption

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Michael Starghill for NPR

Housing and COVID: Why helping people pay rent can help fight the pandemic

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Colin Sweeney, 12, got a shot of the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine as his mother, Nicole, stands by in Pasadena, Calif., in May. As of this week, kids aged 5 to 11 can also get vaccinated against COVID-19. Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP hide caption

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Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP

Some parents want to wait to vaccinate their kids. Here's why doctors say do it now

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Approximately 28 million children are now eligible for Pfizer's lower-dose vaccine

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Subin Yang for NPR

6 tips to help you pick the right health insurance plan

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Children ages 5 to 11 are a step closer to being eligible for the Pfizer vaccine

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FDA extends emergency use authorization of COVID vaccine for kids ages 5-11

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A health care worker administers a dose of the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine to a child at a pediatrician's office in Bingham Farms, Michigan. Federal agencies are considering whether to start giving the vaccine to children ages 5 to 11 in the near future. Emily Elconin/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Emily Elconin/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Advisers vote on whether FDA should authorize Pfizer COVID vaccine for kids

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U.S. COVID infection rates have been dropping, but that could change

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