Selena Simmons-Duffin Selena Simmons-Duffin reports on health policy for NPR.
Selena Simmons-Duffin
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Selena Simmons-Duffin

Olivia Falcigno/NPR
Selena Simmons-Duffin
Olivia Falcigno/NPR

Selena Simmons-Duffin

Health Policy Correspondent

Selena Simmons-Duffin reports on health policy for NPR.

She has worked at NPR for ten years as a show editor and producer, with one stopover at WAMU in 2017 as part of a staff exchange. For four months, she reported local Washington, DC, health stories, including a secretive maternity ward closure and a gesundheit machine.

Before coming to All Things Considered in 2016, Simmons-Duffin spent six years on Morning Edition working shifts at all hours and directing the show. She also drove the full length of the U.S.-Mexico border in 2014 for the "Borderland" series.

She won a Gracie Award in 2015 for creating a video called "Talking While Female," and a 2014 AAAS Kavli Science Journalism Award for producing a series on why you should love your microbes.

Simmons-Duffin attended Stanford University, where she majored in English. She took time off from college to do HIV/AIDS-related work in East Africa. She started out in radio at Stanford's radio station, KZSU, and went on to study documentary radio at the Salt Institute, before coming to NPR as an intern in 2009.

She lives in Washington, DC, with her spouse and kids.

Story Archive

American Medical Association President Dr. Jack Resneck recently recounted how doctors around the country are facing difficulties practicing medicine in states that ban abortion. Nicole Xu for NPR hide caption

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Nicole Xu for NPR

Doctors who want to defy abortion laws say it's too risky

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Doctors who would like to defy abortion laws say it's too risky

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Weeks after her miscarriage was confirmed, Christina Zielke started bleeding heavily while on a trip out of town. At an ER in Ohio, she was given tests but no treatment, and discharged soon after, still bleeding. She says she was told the hospital needed proof there was no fetal development. Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

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Meredith Rizzo/NPR

Her miscarriage left her bleeding profusely. An Ohio ER sent her home to wait

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Karla Renée was 18 weeks into her pregnancy when she and her husband Sam learned that the fetus had a serious genetic anomaly that could lead to severe physical and mental disabilities. They were faced with an enormous and pressing decision. In North Carolina, where they live, the current law forbids abortion after 20 weeks gestational age. Max Posner/NPR hide caption

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At 18 weeks pregnant, she faced an immense decision with just days to make it

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Volunteers deliver water and other items to the homeless in Los Angeles. Poverty rates dropped in 2021 thanks in part to pandemic policy measures, but poverty advocates fear they will rise again without those measures in place. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Poverty and uninsured rates drop, thanks to pandemic-era policies

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Life expectancy drops in the U.S. for the second year in a row

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Flags at the Washington Monument commemorate Americans who died from COVID-19. In 2021, life expectancy in the U.S. fell for the second year in a row. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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After more than 50 years at the NIH, Dr. Fauci says he's retiring in December

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Demonstrators outside PhRMA headquarters in Washington, D.C., protest lobbying by pharmaceutical companies to keep Medicare from negotiating lower prescription drug prices. Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Senate to vote on huge package that would change drug pricing and health insurance

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Ana Elsy Ramirez Diaz holds her baby as he is seen by Dr. Margaret-Anne Fernandez during a checkup visit at INOVA Cares Clinic for Children in Falls Church, Va. A portion of the clinic's patients are insured through the Children's Health Insurance Program. Matt McClain/The Washington Post via Getty Images hide caption

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Millions of kids qualify for Medicaid. Biden funds outreach to boost enrollment

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Dr. Kara Beasley protests the overturning of Roe vs. Wade by the U.S. Supreme Court, in Denver, Colorado on June 24, 2022. JASON CONNOLLY/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Doctors weren't considered in Dobbs, but now they're on abortion's legal front lines

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