Cory Turner Cory Turner edits and reports for the NPR Ed team.
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Cory Turner

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Cory Turner - 2014
Stephen Voss/NPR

Cory Turner

Correspondent/Senior Editor, NPR Ed

Cory Turner reports and edits for the NPR Ed team. He's helped lead several of the team's signature reporting projects, including "The Truth About America's Graduation Rate" (2015), the groundbreaking "School Money" series (2016), "Raising Kings: A Year Of Love And Struggle At Ron Brown College Prep" (2017), and the NPR Life Kit parenting podcast with Sesame Workshop (2019). His year-long investigation with NPR's Chris Arnold, "The Trouble With TEACH Grants" (2018), led the U.S. Department of Education to change the rules of a troubled federal grant program that had unfairly hurt thousands of teachers.

Before coming to NPR Ed, Cory stuck his head inside the mouth of a shark and spent five years as Senior Editor of All Things Considered. His life at NPR began in 2004 with a two-week assignment booking for The Tavis Smiley Show.

In 2000, Cory earned a master's in screenwriting from the University of Southern California and spent several years reading gas meters for the So. Cal. Gas Company. He was only bitten by one dog, a Lhasa Apso, and wrote a bank heist movie you've never seen.

Story Archive

As part of the settlement, the loan servicing company Navient agreed to pay $95 million for states to offer affected borrowers some reimbursement — roughly $260 each to 350,000 borrowers. Kris Tripplaar/Sipa USA via Reuters hide caption

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Kris Tripplaar/Sipa USA via Reuters

Navient reaches a deal to cancel $1.7 billion in student loan debts

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The challenges of trying to keep schools open during the omicron surge

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Teachers tell NPR that exploring previous precedents can help students make sense of what happened on Jan. 6. For example: when invading British troops attacked Washington and set fire to the U.S. Capitol in 1814. Keith Lance/Getty Images hide caption

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Keith Lance/Getty Images

8 ways teachers are talking about Jan. 6 in their classrooms

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1 borrower's student debt is erased with loan forgiveness program overhaul

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Why school enrollment continues to drop

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Hanna Barczyk for NPR

Where are the students? For a second straight year, school enrollment is dropping

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President Biden walks to Marine One outside the White House on Dec. 2. Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images hide caption

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Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images

Biden pledged to forgive $10,000 in student loan debt. Here's what he's done so far

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Thousands of borrowers' student debt is erased with loan forgiveness program overhaul

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LA Johnson/NPR

Borrowers say they were wrongly denied loan forgiveness. Now, help is on the way

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Richard Cordray is the chief operating officer of Federal Student Aid. John Minchillo/AP hide caption

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John Minchillo/AP

4 things to know about possible changes to your student loan debt

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Top student loan official testifies on troubled loan forgiveness program

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Zahra Nealy (left) and Victoria Chamberlin both stand to benefit from recent changes to the Public Service Loan Forgiveness program. Roxanne Turpen and Amanda Andrade-Rhoades for NPR hide caption

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Roxanne Turpen and Amanda Andrade-Rhoades for NPR

Student loan forgiveness is a lot closer for some borrowers, and they are pumped

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