Cory Turner Cory Turner edits and reports for the NPR Ed team.
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Cory Turner

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Cory Turner - 2014
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Cory Turner

Correspondent/Senior Editor, NPR Ed

Cory Turner reports and edits for the NPR Ed team. He's helped lead several of the team's signature reporting projects, including "The Truth About America's Graduation Rate" (2015), the groundbreaking "School Money" series (2016), "Raising Kings: A Year Of Love And Struggle At Ron Brown College Prep" (2017), and the NPR Life Kit parenting podcast with Sesame Workshop (2019). His year-long investigation with NPR's Chris Arnold, "The Trouble With TEACH Grants" (2018), led the U.S. Department of Education to change the rules of a troubled federal grant program that had unfairly hurt thousands of teachers.

Before coming to NPR Ed, Cory stuck his head inside the mouth of a shark and spent five years as Senior Editor of All Things Considered. His life at NPR began in 2004 with a two-week assignment booking for The Tavis Smiley Show.

In 2000, Cory earned a master's in screenwriting from the University of Southern California and spent several years reading gas meters for the So. Cal. Gas Company. He was only bitten by one dog, a Lhasa Apso, and wrote a bank heist movie you've never seen.

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Story Archive

Besides SAT Score, Students Could Have Their Hardships Tabulated

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Life Kit hosts Anya Kamenetz and Cory Turner learn a thing or two about self-regulation, with help from Cookie Monster. NPR hide caption

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The town of Erwin was the site of the now famous hanging of Mary the elephant in 1916. Mike Belleme for NPR hide caption

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The Town That Hanged An Elephant Is Now Working To Save Them

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Teaching kids math doesn't need to involve a textbook. LA Johnson hide caption

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Libsack says she's now feeling "hopeful" because her government finally listened. "For me, as a teacher, it's awesome," she says, "because then I can convey that to the students and say, 'Hey, you do have a voice. You are citizens. You do have a role in our government.' " Beth Nakamura for NPR hide caption

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Beth Nakamura for NPR

Teachers Begin To See Unfair Student Loans Disappear

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Sparkle Unicorns And Fart Ninjas: What Parents Can Do About Gendered Toys

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The Dog Isn't Sleeping: How To Talk With Children About Death

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How To Communicate With Children On Difficult Subjects Such As Death

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