Cory Turner Cory Turner edits and reports for the NPR Ed team.
Cory Turner - Square
Stories By

Cory Turner

Stephen Voss/NPR
Cory Turner - 2014
Stephen Voss/NPR

Cory Turner

Correspondent/Senior Editor, NPR Ed

Cory Turner reports and edits for the NPR Ed team. He's helped lead several of the team's signature reporting projects, including "The Truth About America's Graduation Rate" (2015), the groundbreaking "School Money" series (2016), "Raising Kings: A Year Of Love And Struggle At Ron Brown College Prep" (2017), and the NPR Life Kit parenting podcast with Sesame Workshop (2019). His year-long investigation with NPR's Chris Arnold, "The Trouble With TEACH Grants" (2018), led the U.S. Department of Education to change the rules of a troubled federal grant program that had unfairly hurt thousands of teachers.

Before coming to NPR Ed, Cory stuck his head inside the mouth of a shark and spent five years as Senior Editor of All Things Considered. His life at NPR began in 2004 with a two-week assignment booking for The Tavis Smiley Show.

In 2000, Cory earned a master's in screenwriting from the University of Southern California and spent several years reading gas meters for the So. Cal. Gas Company. He was only bitten by one dog, a Lhasa Apso, and wrote a bank heist movie you've never seen.

Story Archive

Saturday

A California school is addressing chronic absenteeism at the root

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/nx-s1-4918857/nx-s1-c8ffcdc8-a243-4108-93c1-e9c5828a20f4" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Wednesday

Fahmida Azim for NPR

Why children with disabilities are missing school and losing skills

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1247795768/1251750111" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Tuesday

Students with disabilities are missing school because of staff shortages

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1251408094/1251408095" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Thursday

GOP lawmakers turn their attention to antisemitism in K-12 public schools

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1250136545/1250136546" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Wednesday

David Banks, chancellor of New York City Public Schools, testified at a House Education Committee hearing on antisemitism on Wednesday. He was joined by Karla Silvestre, president of the Montgomery County Board of Education in Maryland, Emerson Sykes, staff attorney with the ACLU, and Enikia Ford Morthel, superintendent of the Berkeley Unified School District in California. Jacquelyn Martin/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Jacquelyn Martin/AP

Republicans and K-12 school leaders clash over handling of antisemitism

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1249994099/1250052888" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Monday

School principals get creative to keep their staff in the classrooms

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1241269485/1242104146" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Wednesday

The $190 billion in emergency funds given to schools during the pandemic is ending

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1239609135/1239609136" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Wednesday

Children at a child care center in Des Moines, Iowa, in 2022. Kathryn Gamble/Bloomberg/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Kathryn Gamble/Bloomberg/Getty Images

Should the government do more to help children? This bipartisan group thinks so

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1234030355/1236875799" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Wednesday

The Biden Administration is erasing debts of 150,000 federal student loan borrowers

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1233009383/1233009384" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Friday

From 2022-2023, chronic absenteeism declined in 33 of the 39 states AEI looked at. But it was still a persistent problem: In a handful of places, including Nevada, Washington, D.C., Michigan, New Mexico and Oregon, roughly 1 in 3 students – or more – were chronically absent. LA Johnson/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
LA Johnson/NPR

K-12 students learned a lot last year, but they're still missing too much school

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1228441120/1230517758" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Wednesday

U.S. Secretary of Education Miguel Cardona has led the department through a massive FAFSA overhaul mandated by Congress about three years ago. Colin Myers/Claflin University/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Colin Myers/Claflin University/Getty Images

A new FAFSA setback means many college financial aid offers won't come until April

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1228082594/1228286384" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Tuesday

Myrna Aguilar and her son, David Thornton, pose for a portrait at their home in Los Angeles. Thornton applied for a pell grant last year, but did not qualify this academic year even though their income hasn't changed. Gabriella Angotti-Jones for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Gabriella Angotti-Jones for NPR

Exclusive: The Education Department says it will fix its $1.8 billion FAFSA mistake

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1226406495/1226406496" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Friday

The SAVE plan is becoming a key vehicle for President Biden's student loan debt relief efforts. In a Friday press release, U.S. Education Secretary Miguel Cardona said, "The Biden-Harris Administration designed the SAVE Plan to put community college students and other low-balance borrowers on a faster track to debt forgiveness than ever before." Ting Shen/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Ting Shen/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Education Dept. fast-tracks forgiveness for borrowers with smaller student loans

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1224265472/1224358068" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Tuesday

New FAFSA comes with a big mistake that could lower students' financial aid

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1223786940/1223788693" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Since the new FAFSA launched on Dec. 30, 2023, the form has only been available for short periods of time. That changed this week. On Tuesday, the U.S. Education Department said applicants will now have 24-hour access. Screenshot by NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Screenshot by NPR

The FAFSA rollout has been rough on students. The biggest problem is yet to come

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1222664638/1223626452" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Friday

Tuesday

Thursday

Margaret Flatley for NPR

Student loan forgiveness isn't dead yet, and other takeaways from 2023

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1218890183/1221942483" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Wednesday

Kurt Panton, his wife, Lizzy, and their daughter, Pauline. His federal student loans have been canceled by a new Biden administration policy meant to remedy past failures with income-driven repayment plans. Patrick Junker for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Patrick Junker for NPR

A story of student loan forgiveness, 20 years in the making

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1215880180/1220726017" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Sunday

NPR staffers share their fiction picks from Books We Love

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1218433009/1218433010" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Saturday

For some, the SAVE plan for student loans has meant monthly payments of zero

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1218386125/1218386126" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Wednesday

Miguel Cardona, the U.S. Education Secretary, announced new efforts to help borrowers hurt by problems with its repayment programs. Arin Yoon/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Arin Yoon/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Government efforts to erase student loan debt have now reached 3.6 million borrowers

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1217552875/1217663405" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Thursday

Andrew Haener for NPR

Millions could benefit from a new way out of student loan default

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1212868047/1213590195" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Tuesday

Education Secretary Miguel Cardona talks to reporters during the daily news conference in the Brady Press Briefing Room at the White House on June 30, 2023 in Washington, D.C. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Education Department punishes student loan servicer for billing mistakes

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1209464901/1209763264" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript