Cory Turner Cory Turner edits and reports for the NPR Ed team.
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Cory Turner

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Cory Turner - 2014
Stephen Voss/NPR

Cory Turner

Correspondent/Senior Editor, NPR Ed

Cory Turner reports and edits for the NPR Ed team. He's helped lead several of the team's signature reporting projects, including "The Truth About America's Graduation Rate" (2015), the groundbreaking "School Money" series (2016), "Raising Kings: A Year Of Love And Struggle At Ron Brown College Prep" (2017), and the NPR Life Kit parenting podcast with Sesame Workshop (2019). His year-long investigation with NPR's Chris Arnold, "The Trouble With TEACH Grants" (2018), led the U.S. Department of Education to change the rules of a troubled federal grant program that had unfairly hurt thousands of teachers.

Before coming to NPR Ed, Cory stuck his head inside the mouth of a shark and spent five years as Senior Editor of All Things Considered. His life at NPR began in 2004 with a two-week assignment booking for The Tavis Smiley Show.

In 2000, Cory earned a master's in screenwriting from the University of Southern California and spent several years reading gas meters for the So. Cal. Gas Company. He was only bitten by one dog, a Lhasa Apso, and wrote a bank heist movie you've never seen.

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Story Archive

Drew Lehman of Lansdale, Pa., became unable to work after a traumatic car accident. He is currently navigating the confusing, bureaucratic process of getting his federal student loans discharged. /Natalie Piserchio for NPR hide caption

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/Natalie Piserchio for NPR

Education Dept. Restores Debt Cancellation For Some Borrowers With Disabilities

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Students returned to in-person learning on a hybrid model this week at St. Anthony Catholic High School in Long Beach, Calif. The country is on track to have a majority of schools open in the next two months, but not all children are going back. Patrick T. Fallon/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Patrick T. Fallon/AFP via Getty Images

As Districts Reopen For In-Person Learning, What Schools May Look Like Going Forward

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3 Feet Apart: New CDC Guidance For Students May Allow For More Schools To Reopen

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Jeevan Guha, 6, offers a view of pandemic-era schooling with this homemade sign in San Francisco. The sign reads, "I miss my school." Yalonda M. James/San Francisco Chronicle via Getty Images hide caption

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Yalonda M. James/San Francisco Chronicle via Getty Images

CDC Says Schools Can Now Space Students 3 Feet Apart, Rather Than 6

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U.S. Education Secretary Miguel Cardona speaks at the White House on Wednesday. The Department of Education says it is scrapping a controversial, Trump-era policy that granted only partial student loan relief to borrowers who were defrauded by private, for-profit colleges. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP

Kendra Mendoza's son, Joshua, has cerebral palsy. She says he loves school, but got little of the therapy he needed this spring. Scott Alario for NPR hide caption

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Scott Alario for NPR

Checking Back With A Teacher, College Student and Mother After A Year At Home

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First lady Jill Biden and Education Secretary Miguel Cardona tour Benjamin Franklin Elementary School in Meriden, Conn. Mandel Ngan/AP hide caption

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Mandel Ngan/AP

New Education Secretary Miguel Cardona Wants Schools Open 'As Soon As Possible'

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Biden Administration Makes Vaccines A Priority For Teachers

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With One Move, Congress Could Lift Millions Of Children Out Of Poverty

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Lawmakers Consider 2 Plans For Monthly Payments To Address Child Poverty

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