Cory Turner Cory Turner edits and reports for the NPR Ed team.
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Cory Turner

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Cory Turner - 2014
Stephen Voss/NPR

Cory Turner

Correspondent/Senior Editor, NPR Ed

Cory Turner reports and edits for the NPR Ed team. He's helped lead several of the team's signature reporting projects, including "The Truth About America's Graduation Rate" (2015), the groundbreaking "School Money" series (2016), "Raising Kings: A Year Of Love And Struggle At Ron Brown College Prep" (2017), and the NPR Life Kit parenting podcast with Sesame Workshop (2019). His year-long investigation with NPR's Chris Arnold, "The Trouble With TEACH Grants" (2018), led the U.S. Department of Education to change the rules of a troubled federal grant program that had unfairly hurt thousands of teachers.

Before coming to NPR Ed, Cory stuck his head inside the mouth of a shark and spent five years as Senior Editor of All Things Considered. His life at NPR began in 2004 with a two-week assignment booking for The Tavis Smiley Show.

In 2000, Cory earned a master's in screenwriting from the University of Southern California and spent several years reading gas meters for the So. Cal. Gas Company. He was only bitten by one dog, a Lhasa Apso, and wrote a bank heist movie you've never seen.

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Story Archive

Parents Say Schools Must Make Up For Failing Kids With Disabilities During Pandemic

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Domeniqu works on his computer at his home in Crownpoint. Adria Malcolm for NPR hide caption

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Adria Malcolm for NPR

After Months Of Special Education Turmoil, Families Say Schools Owe Them

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A student wears a mask while swinging around with her kindergarten class this month at Kenter Canyon School in Los Angeles. Sarah Reingewirtz/Los Angeles Daily News/Southern California News Group via Getty Images hide caption

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Sarah Reingewirtz/Los Angeles Daily News/Southern California News Group via Getty Images

Eighth-graders Braeden Collett (left), Bo Porter, Brennan Williams and Dominique Jannat explored the "various things that get done behind the scenes" to make their campus run smoothly in their winning podcast "Whodunnit?" Arden Barnes for NPR hide caption

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Arden Barnes for NPR

The Best Student Podcasts: An 8th-Grade Homage To A School's Unsung Heroes

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NPR Student Podcast Challenge winner Kriti Sarav poses for a portrait while on the top balcony of her family's home in Chicago. Olivia Obineme for NPR hide caption

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Olivia Obineme for NPR

'Be Proud Of Where You Come From': An Indian-American Teen's Winning Podcast

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Biden Expected To Unveil Ambitious (And Expensive) Education Proposals

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Students carry sack lunches at Elk Ridge Elementary School in Buckley, Wash. On Monday, USDA unveiled a new program that would feed millions of children over the summer, when many schools are closed. Ted S. Warren/AP hide caption

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Ted S. Warren/AP

USDA Moves To Feed Millions Of Children Over The Summer

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Rashida Humphrey-Wall (right) with her son Kai Humphrey at their home in Washington, D.C. Elissa Nadworny/NPR hide caption

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Elissa Nadworny/NPR

How Schools Can Help Kids Heal After A Year Of 'Crisis And Uncertainty'

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Drew Lehman of Lansdale, Pa., became unable to work after a traumatic car accident. He is currently navigating the confusing, bureaucratic process of getting his federal student loans discharged. /Natalie Piserchio for NPR hide caption

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/Natalie Piserchio for NPR

Education Dept. Restores Debt Cancellation For Some Borrowers With Disabilities

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Students returned to in-person learning on a hybrid model this week at St. Anthony Catholic High School in Long Beach, Calif. The country is on track to have a majority of schools open in the next two months, but not all children are going back. Patrick T. Fallon/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Patrick T. Fallon/AFP via Getty Images

As Districts Reopen For In-Person Learning, What Schools May Look Like Going Forward

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3 Feet Apart: New CDC Guidance For Students May Allow For More Schools To Reopen

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Jeevan Guha, 6, offers a view of pandemic-era schooling with this homemade sign in San Francisco. The sign reads, "I miss my school." Yalonda M. James/San Francisco Chronicle via Getty Images hide caption

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Yalonda M. James/San Francisco Chronicle via Getty Images

CDC Says Schools Can Now Space Students 3 Feet Apart, Rather Than 6

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