Cory Turner Cory Turner edits and reports for the NPR Ed team.
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Cory Turner

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Cory Turner - 2014
Stephen Voss/NPR

Cory Turner

Correspondent/Senior Editor, NPR Ed

Cory Turner reports and edits for the NPR Ed team. He's helped lead several of the team's signature reporting projects, including "The Truth About America's Graduation Rate" (2015), the groundbreaking "School Money" series (2016), "Raising Kings: A Year Of Love And Struggle At Ron Brown College Prep" (2017), and the NPR Life Kit parenting podcast with Sesame Workshop (2019). His year-long investigation with NPR's Chris Arnold, "The Trouble With TEACH Grants" (2018), led the U.S. Department of Education to change the rules of a troubled federal grant program that had unfairly hurt thousands of teachers.

Before coming to NPR Ed, Cory stuck his head inside the mouth of a shark and spent five years as Senior Editor of All Things Considered. His life at NPR began in 2004 with a two-week assignment booking for The Tavis Smiley Show.

In 2000, Cory earned a master's in screenwriting from the University of Southern California and spent several years reading gas meters for the So. Cal. Gas Company. He was only bitten by one dog, a Lhasa Apso, and wrote a bank heist movie you've never seen.

Story Archive

Thousands of borrowers' student debt is erased with loan forgiveness program overhaul

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Borrowers say they were wrongly denied loan forgiveness. Now, help is on the way

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Richard Cordray is the chief operating officer of Federal Student Aid. John Minchillo/AP hide caption

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John Minchillo/AP

4 things to know about possible changes to your student loan debt

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Top student loan official testifies on troubled loan forgiveness program

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Zahra Nealy (left) and Victoria Chamberlin both stand to benefit from recent changes to the Public Service Loan Forgiveness program. Roxanne Turpen and Amanda Andrade-Rhoades for NPR hide caption

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Roxanne Turpen and Amanda Andrade-Rhoades for NPR

Student loan forgiveness is a lot closer for some borrowers, and they are pumped

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"Borrowers who devote a decade of their lives to public service should be able to rely on the promise of Public Service Loan Forgiveness," U.S. Education Secretary Miguel Cardona said on Wednesday. Joshua Roberts/Getty Images hide caption

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Joshua Roberts/Getty Images
LA Johnson/NPR

NPR Exclusive: Troubled Public Service Loan Forgiveness program will get overhaul

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Miguel Cardona, U.S. secretary of education, speaks during a news conference at the White House on Thursday, Aug. 5, 2021. Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images

U.S. Education Secretary Miguel Cardona accompanies North High School's marching band on the cowbell during a Monday pep rally in Eau Claire, Wis. Tim Gruber for NPR hide caption

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Tim Gruber for NPR

The Education Secretary Plays Hardball (And A Cowbell) To Push For Safe Schools

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U.S. Education Secretary Miguel Cardona, pictured here in March, begins a back-to-school tour of the Midwest on Monday. Chris Kleponis/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Chris Kleponis/Bloomberg via Getty Images

The Stakes Feel Higher Than Ever As The Education Secretary Welcomes Students Back

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A child reaches out to touch a flower adorning the Sept. 11 memorial on the name of a veteran killed in the 2001 terror attacks. For today's generation of kids, 9/11 is a history lesson. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

How To Talk About 9/11 With A New Generation Of Kids

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Do School Mask Bans Violate The Rights Of Children With Disabilities?

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A student attends summer classes at E.N. White School in Holyoke, Mass. In a new survey of school superintendents, 75% of respondents said they were using federal COVID-19 relief dollars to pay for summer learning and other enrichment activities. Charles Krupa/AP hide caption

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Charles Krupa/AP

Schools Are Getting Billions In COVID Relief Money. Here's How They Plan To Spend It

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