Rich Preston
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Rich Preston

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London Residents Remember Subway Bombing 10 Years Ago

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The wreck of a double-decker bus in central London on July 8, 2005, one day after a series of terrorist attacks on public transportation killed more than 50 people and injured more than 700. Dylan Martinez/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Dylan Martinez/AFP/Getty Images

The Painful Memories Of Those Who Survived London's 2005 Terror Attacks

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There's a strong element of buying with your eyes at Tincan. Rows of gourmet-quality tins, beautifully packaged in collectible-worthy cans, are displayed at eye level. Paul Winch-Furness/Courtesy of Tincan hide caption

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Paul Winch-Furness/Courtesy of Tincan

Definitely not traditional: two colorful takes on porridge, from Friday's London Porridge Championships. Dai Williams/Courtesy of the National Porridge Championship hide caption

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Dai Williams/Courtesy of the National Porridge Championship

Cameron Seeks To Expand Terrorism Laws To Target British Fighters

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Revelers dance in their pajamas at Morning Gloryville in London in January. The nightclub, which holds a rave once a month beginning at 6:30 a.m., has inspired morning raves in a number of other cities around the world. Andrew Winning/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Andrew Winning/Reuters/Landov

It's Sunrise In London And Time For A Rave

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Michael Palin, left, and Terry Gilliam perform on the opening night of Monty Python Live (Mostly). The final performance of the reunion show, on Sunday, will be live-streamed at theaters around the world. Dave J Hogan/Getty Images hide caption

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Dave J Hogan/Getty Images

At Monty Python Reunion Show, The Circus Makes One Last Flight

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