Arezou Rezvani Arezou Rezvani is a senior editor for NPR's Morning Edition.
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Arezou Rezvani

Arezou Rezvani

Editor, Morning Edition

Arezou Rezvani is a reporter and senior editor for NPR's Morning Edition. She's also founding editor of Up First, NPR's daily news podcast.

Much of her work centers on people experiencing some of the most difficult days of their lives. She's reported from Afghanistan under Taliban rule, has spent time in Lebanon covering the impact of the country's shattered economy on everyday people, and was in Ukraine during the early days of Russia's war working on stories about Ukraine's resistance and the war's impact on children.

Her work on a multi-part series about children and opioid addiction won a Gracie Award in 2019. She was awarded a White House News Photographer Association Award for Politics is Personal, an audio/visual project she led ahead of the 2018 midterm elections.

In 2014, she led an investigation into the Pentagon's 1033 program, which supplies local law enforcement with surplus military-grade weapons and vehicles. The findings were cited by lawmakers during hearings on Capitol Hill and contributed to the Obama administration's decision to scale back the program.

Rezvani holds a master's degree in journalism from the University of Southern California and bachelor's degrees in political science and French from the University of California, Davis.

Story Archive

Coal mining is a dangerous job. In Afghanistan, kids often do much of the work

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Afghans are worried about winter hardships amid a tanking economy

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Jaylin Jones, 28, an assembly floor technician, while working on the assembly line at the Ford Rouge Electric Vehicle Center in Dearborn, Mich., on September 7th, 2022. Brittany Greeson for NPR hide caption

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Brittany Greeson for NPR

Auto companies are racing to meet an electric future, and transforming the workforce

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To fully embrace electric vehicles, the auto industry must adjust its workforce

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A picture obtained by AFP outside Iran on Sept. 21 shows Iranian demonstrators in Tehran during a protest for Mahsa Amini, days after she died in police custody. AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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AFP via Getty Images

The protests won't lead to regime change, Iran's foreign minister tells NPR

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How Did Russia's War On Ukraine Drive Up U.S. Energy Bills?

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A spike in natural gas prices amid a hot summer is contributing to high electricity bills across the United States. Here, the sun sets behind electric power lines in Redondo Beach, Calif., on Aug. 31. Patrick T. Fallon/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Patrick T. Fallon/AFP via Getty Images

The impact of the global natural gas shortage on the U.S.

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Taliban guards stand at the entrance of the National Museum of Afghanistan after it reopened under Taliban control in Kabul in December. Mustafa Melih Ahishali/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images hide caption

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Mustafa Melih Ahishali/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

The Taliban now guard Afghanistan's National Museum, where they once smashed objects

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Traffic on the 405 freeway in Los Angeles on Aug. 25. California ruled Thursday that all new cars sold in the state must be zero-emission vehicles by 2035. Patrick T. Fallon/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Patrick T. Fallon/AFP via Getty Images

California wants to end sales of new gas cars by 2035. Here are 4 key roadblocks

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Afghans from minority groups face new threats — this time from ISIS

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