Arezou Rezvani Arezou Rezvani is a senior editor for NPR's Morning Edition.
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Arezou Rezvani

Friday

Tuesday

Could a bill passed by the previous Congress make it easier to save for retirement?

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Saturday

A boy works in a coal mine north of Kabul. Afghanistan's state-run coal industry is going strong in an otherwise shattered economy. Many underage workers are the ones who are extracting the coal. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

In Afghanistan, coal mining relies on the labor of children

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Friday

Encore: Rising interest rates plunge the housing market into a deep freeze

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Thursday

Monday

Children ride scooters past a house for sale in Los Angeles. Home sales have slowed as mortgage rates have climbed. Allison Dinner/Getty Images hide caption

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Allison Dinner/Getty Images

2022 marked the end of cheap mortgages and now the housing market has turned icy cold

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Monday

Friday

Friday

Coal mining is a dangerous job. In Afghanistan, kids often do much of the work

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Friday

Afghans are worried about winter hardships amid a tanking economy

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Saturday

Jaylin Jones, 28, an assembly floor technician, while working on the assembly line at the Ford Rouge Electric Vehicle Center in Dearborn, Mich., on September 7th, 2022. Brittany Greeson for NPR hide caption

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Brittany Greeson for NPR

Auto companies are racing to meet an electric future, and transforming the workforce

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Friday

To fully embrace electric vehicles, the auto industry must adjust its workforce

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Tuesday

A picture obtained by AFP outside Iran on Sept. 21 shows Iranian demonstrators in Tehran during a protest for Mahsa Amini, days after she died in police custody. AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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AFP via Getty Images

The protests won't lead to regime change, Iran's foreign minister tells NPR

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Saturday

A spike in natural gas prices amid a hot summer is contributing to high electricity bills across the United States. Here, the sun sets behind electric power lines in Redondo Beach, Calif., on Aug. 31. Patrick T. Fallon/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Patrick T. Fallon/AFP via Getty Images