Nurith Aizenman
Nurith Aizenman, photographed for NPR, 11 March 2020, in Washington DC.
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Nurith Aizenman

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Thursday

Wednesday

In Africa, world health officials roll out first routine malaria vaccine

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Monday

Anthropologist Carla Handley, center, meets with Wario Bala, right, to present the results of a DNA study she conducted seven years ago in his community in northern Kenya. Rebecca Siford hide caption

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Rebecca Siford

If you donate DNA, what should scientists give in return? A 'pathbreaking' new model

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Wednesday

Left to right: Alexis Mukwedi tested positive for sleeping sickness in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. A sandfly, whose bite can spread the parasite causing visceral leishmaniasis, lands on the photographer for a blood meal. A woman in Vietnam receives an eye exam to see if she has trachoma, which can cause blindness. Last year several countries eliminated the threat from this disease. Xavier Vaheed-DNDi, James Gathany/CDC, AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Xavier Vaheed-DNDi, James Gathany/CDC, AFP via Getty Images

Some overlooked good news from 2023: Six countries knock out 'neglected' diseases

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Sunday

Several countries made progress in disease elimination this year

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Thursday

A 2017 meeting of a rotating savings club formed in a village near Lake Victoria soon after every adult there was chosen to receive a monthly through GiveDirectly's experiment. The clubs have enabled recipients to convert their grants into lump sum payments: Each month the members put $10 into the communual pot — for a total of $100 — and a different person takes it home. Nichole Sobecki for NPR hide caption

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Nichole Sobecki for NPR

It's one of the biggest experiments in fighting global poverty. Now the results are in

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Tuesday

People can do more with lump sum of money than payments, experiment in Kenya suggests

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Wednesday

As life under climate change grows more difficult, one group says cash aid can help

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Tuesday

The aftermath of a mudslide that ripped through villages on the foothills of Mount Elgon in 2012, killing at least 18 people. The slopes of this extinct volcano in eastern Uganda have become increasingly prone to such disasters as a result of climate change. The looming question: How do you help people find a safe new place to live? Isaac Kasamani/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Isaac Kasamani/AFP via Getty Images

Why villagers haven't left mudslide-prone mountain — and how a novel plan might help

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Tuesday

Wednesday

Joyce Mutisya, 71, outside her home in Wote, Kenya. For years she's struggled with symptoms of dementia. But she didn't realize it was a condition for which she could seek professional help. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

What if you had dementia — and didn't know it?

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Tuesday

A project in rural Kenya aims to help those with dementia

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Wednesday

Former U.S. President George W. Bush speaks during an event to mark the 20th anniversary of PEPFAR (President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief) at the United States Institute of Peace on February 24, 2023 in Washington, DC. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

Monday

The successful anti-AIDS program PEPFAR is under threat in Congress

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Tuesday

Gerhardt Boukes, chief scientist at Afrigen Biologics and Vaccines, formulates mRNA for use in a vaccine against COVID-19. The company — based in Cape Town, South Africa — is the linchpin of a global project to enable low- and middle-income countries to make mRNA vaccines against all manner of diseases. Tommy Trenchard for NPR hide caption

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Tommy Trenchard for NPR

Friday

Kaz Fantone/NPR

In a hot room, you're told to play a vicious game. Will heat make you behave badly?

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Monday

Does heat make us more aggressive? Researchers put it to the test

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Sunday

How scientists are using fish music to protect coral reefs

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Saturday

A group of young women from the Awa people in Brazil hold their bows and arrows as they return from a hunt. A new reexamination of ethnographic studies finds female hunters are common in hunter-gatherer societies. Scott Wallace/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Wallace/Getty Images

Men are hunters, women are gatherers. That was the assumption. A new study upends it.

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Wednesday

Ancient women were hunters — and grandmas were the most skilled ones, study suggests

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Thursday

Scientist Amy Apprill, with Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, places a recording device onto a coral reef in the U.S. Virgin Islands. Paul Caiger/Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution hide caption

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Paul Caiger/Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Fish make music! It could be the key to healing degraded coral reefs

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Tuesday

A vendor in a market in Nigeria counts local bills. The country is one of dozens whose devalued currency is fueling a debt crisis. Pius Utomi Ekpei/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Pius Utomi Ekpei/AFP via Getty Images

A dilemma for dozens of countries: Fund your schools and hospitals or pay your debt

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Monday

1 in 5 people around the world now live in countries teetering toward debt default

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Friday

WHO announces that COVID-19 is no longer a global emergency

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