Nurith Aizenman
Nurith Aizenman, photographed for NPR, 11 March 2020, in Washington DC.
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Nurith Aizenman

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Romie Perez and Elia Zamarripa at Perez's house. The two are among the many holding impromptu cookouts to make meals for the families of the victims. Nurith Aizenman/NPR hide caption

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Nurith Aizenman/NPR

In Uvalde, tragedy and food bring a community together

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An update on the global COVID-19 vaccination effort

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Volunteers unload food aid in Chena, Ethiopia, one of many parts of the world where conflict has fueled hunger. Jemal Countess/Getty Images hide caption

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Jemal Countess/Getty Images

Ukraine crisis raises question: Does food aid go equally to 'Black and white lives'?

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The impact of the war in Ukraine on the global food supply

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Nick Underwood/NPR

The goal: Vaccinate 70% of the world against COVID. Scientists are proposing a reboot

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It may be time to refocus the goal of vaccinating 70% of every country, advocates say

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A driver sits in the cab of a combine harvester during the summer harvest in a field of wheat in Varva, Ukraine. Ukraine accounts for more than 10% of the global wheat market. Russia's war threatens to disrupt the spring planting season. Vincent Mundy/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Vincent Mundy/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Russia's war on Ukraine is dire for world hunger. But there are solutions

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Global health champion Paul Farmer dies at 62

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Dr. Paul Farmer, photographed in 2017 at a screening of a film about his life's work, Bending the Arc. Desiree Navarro/Getty Images hide caption

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Desiree Navarro/Getty Images

Global health champion Dr. Paul Farmer has died

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A student washes her hands before entering a classroom at a school in Blantyre, Malawi, in March 2021. Top scientists say that many African countries, including Malawi, appear to have already arrived at a substantially less threatening stage of the coronavirus pandemic. Joseph Mizere/Xinhua News Agency/Getty Images hide caption

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Joseph Mizere/Xinhua News Agency/Getty Images

Africa may have reached the pandemic's holy grail

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Top scientists say Africa may have reached a less threatening phase of COVID

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Most countries will fall short of global initiative to vaccinate 40% of populations

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U.S. has been slow to roll out a campaign encouraging booster shots as omicron surges

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Here's a computer-generated image of the omicron variant of the coronavirus — also known as B.1.1.529. Reported in South Africa on Nov. 24, this variant has a large number of mutations, some of which are concerning. Uma Shankar Sharma/Getty Images hide caption

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Uma Shankar Sharma/Getty Images

The mystery of where omicron came from — and why it matters

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