Nurith Aizenman
Stories By

Nurith Aizenman

Aniket Sathe, 15, is in a program that's trying to persuade India's boys to treat girls as their equals. Here he's pictured with his younger sister, Aarati, 12, waiting for the rain to stop before walking her to school. Poulomi Basu / VII Photo/for NPR hide caption

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Poulomi Basu / VII Photo/for NPR

Why This Boy Started Helping His Sister With Chores: #15Girls

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Sleepless Nights And Lighter Wallets: The Link Between Poverty And Sleep

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Scenes like this, from Kolkata, are typical across some of India's biggest cities. Dibyangshu Sarkar /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Dibyangshu Sarkar /AFP/Getty Images

A Bad Night's Sleep Might Do More Harm Than You Think

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Nimmu, 15, on the terrace of the Veerni Institute. To stay in school, she needs to pass a national test this March. The problem: "I'm not a great student," she says. Because child marriage is illegal in India, we can't use her full name. Poulomi Basu/VII Photo hide caption

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Poulomi Basu/VII Photo

Why This Child Bride Needs Good Grades: #15Girls

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A nurse in Hyderabad, India, gives a vaccine to a child. The immunization will protect against diphtheria, pertussis, tetanus and other diseases. Noah Seelam/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Noah Seelam/AFP/Getty Images

Parents In Poor Countries Worry About Vaccines, Too

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Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon (right, with blue necktie) arrives in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, for the International Conference on Financing for Development. Courtesy of UN Photo/Eskinder Debebe hide caption

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Courtesy of UN Photo/Eskinder Debebe

The World Could Wipe Out Extreme Poverty By 2030. There's Just One Catch

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Street children sleep on a discarded mattress on a center island near a road crossing in Manila, Philippines, in April. After 15 years of the Millennium Development Goals, Asia as a region has had the fastest progress, reports the U.N., yet hundreds of millions of people there remain in extreme poverty. Jay Directo/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jay Directo/AFP/Getty Images

How To Eliminate Extreme Poverty In 169 Not-So-Easy Steps

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Schoolgirls in Ethiopia examine a new feminine product: underwear with a pocket for a menstrual pad. Courtesy of Be Girl Inc. hide caption

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Courtesy of Be Girl Inc.

People Are Finally Talking About The Thing Nobody Wants To Talk About

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