Nurith Aizenman
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Nurith Aizenman

Researcher Beatriz Parra Patino (right) prepares to test the blood and urine of patients with Guillain-Barre syndrome to see if they had Zika virus as well. She's been working seven days a week, up to 14 hours a day, to test samples as quickly as possible. Becky Sullivan/NPR hide caption

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Becky Sullivan/NPR

The Answer To A Zika Mystery Could Lie In Test Tubes In Colombia

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Protected from bites by a mosquito net, this pregnant woman, in her second trimester, came into the hospital in Cucuta, Colombia, with symptoms of Zika. A blood test is being run to find out if she has the virus. Nurith Aizenman/NPR hide caption

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Nurith Aizenman/NPR

All Eyes Are On Colombia: Will Zika Trigger A Spike In Microcephaly?

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These people have just walked across the bridge from Venezuela to Colombia, where the Colombian immigration authorities are on duty. Many people live on one side and work on the other, crossing so frequently they don't have to register with officials each time. Vladimir Solano for NPR hide caption

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Vladimir Solano for NPR

Venezuela Won't Talk To Colombia About Zika — And That's A Problem

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Johann Castro Hernandez, 18, is recovering from Guillain-Barre syndrome after he appeared to have fallen sick with Zika virus around New Year's. His mom, Janina Hernandez, is at right. Becky Sullivan/NPR hide caption

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Becky Sullivan/NPR

Colombian Clinic Probes A Mystery: Is Zika Triggering A Rare Disorder?

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Colombia City Grapples With Major Zika Outbreak

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The man in the T-shirt is Paolo Sandoval, 42. His wife (seated, far right, in a white shirt) is Jessica Vivana Torres, 30. She's 15 weeks pregnant with their first child and came down with Zika three weeks ago. "I'm really worried about brain damage in the baby," says Sandoval, who listens intently as the ultrasound doctor describes the procedure. Nurith Aizenman/NPR hide caption

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Nurith Aizenman/NPR

With Zika Looming, What's It Like At A Maternity Clinic In Colombia?

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No, he didn't repossess this car from a corrupt official. As a hobby, global health avenger Cees Klumper fixes up classic cars. This one is the actual El Camino used in the TV series My Name Is Earl. Klumper tracked it down and had it shipped to Geneva. Courtesy of Anneke Cees Klumper hide caption

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Courtesy of Anneke Cees Klumper

A Health Ministry employee fumigates against the Aedes aegypti mosquito, which can carry the Zika virus, at a home in Caracas, Venezuela, on Jan. 28. Juan Barreto /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Juan Barreto /AFP/Getty Images

How Many Zika Cases Are There In Venezuela: 4,000 Or 400,000?

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Joseph Daniel Fiedler for NPR

El Niño Does Bring Floods And Drought, But There's A Silver Lining

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Guinea is where the Ebola outbreak started in West Africa. In this photo from November 2014, workers from the local Red Cross prepare to bury people who died of the virus. Kenzo Tribouillard /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Kenzo Tribouillard /AFP/Getty Images

5 Mysteries About Ebola: From Bats To Eyeballs To Blood

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A farmer in Ethiopia, in the grips of its worst drought in decades. Thomas Imo/Photothek via Getty Images hide caption

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Thomas Imo/Photothek via Getty Images

What Happens When A Disaster Unfolds In Slow Motion

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Aniket Sathe, 15, is in a program that's trying to persuade India's boys to treat girls as their equals. Here he's pictured with his younger sister, Aarati, 12, waiting for the rain to stop before walking her to school. Poulomi Basu / VII Photo/for NPR hide caption

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Poulomi Basu / VII Photo/for NPR

Why This Boy Started Helping His Sister With Chores: #15Girls

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