Nurith Aizenman
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Nurith Aizenman

Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon (right, with blue necktie) arrives in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, for the International Conference on Financing for Development. Courtesy of UN Photo/Eskinder Debebe hide caption

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Courtesy of UN Photo/Eskinder Debebe

The World Could Wipe Out Extreme Poverty By 2030. There's Just One Catch

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Street children sleep on a discarded mattress on a center island near a road crossing in Manila, Philippines, in April. After 15 years of the Millennium Development Goals, Asia as a region has had the fastest progress, reports the U.N., yet hundreds of millions of people there remain in extreme poverty. Jay Directo/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jay Directo/AFP/Getty Images

How To Eliminate Extreme Poverty In 169 Not-So-Easy Steps

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Schoolgirls in Ethiopia examine a new feminine product: underwear with a pocket for a menstrual pad. Courtesy of Be Girl Inc. hide caption

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Courtesy of Be Girl Inc.

People Are Finally Talking About The Thing Nobody Wants To Talk About

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Tanzanians from far-flung villages were brought to a fancy hotel to discuss natural gas policy. Courtesy of the Center for Global Development hide caption

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Courtesy of the Center for Global Development

It's Not A Come-On From A Cult. It's A New Kind Of Poll!

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Travon Addison sits at the house he grew up in, bought by his great-grandmother, he thinks, in 1920. His family members had to abandon the home 15 years ago because they couldn't afford to fix it. Nurith Aizenman/NPR hide caption

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Nurith Aizenman/NPR

'Baltimore For Real': A Tour Through Troubled Sandtown

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Baltimore State's Attorney Known For Understanding City's Poor Communities

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Baltimore Unrest Reveals Tensions Between African-Americans And Asians

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Liberian workers dismantle shelters in an Ebola treatment center in the Paynes Ville neighborhood of Monrovia. Doctors Without Borders closed the center last month because it was no longer needed. Zoom Dosso/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Zoom Dosso/AFP/Getty Images

Heffernan photographs health care worker Martha Lyne Freeman. Courtesy of Marc Campos/Occidental College hide caption

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Courtesy of Marc Campos/Occidental College

An Artist's Brainstorm: Put Photos On Those Faceless Ebola Suits

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Light shines through the chlorine-stained windows in the blood-testing area at Redemption Hospital in New Kru Town, Monrovia, Liberia. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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David Gilkey/NPR

As Ebola Crisis Ebbs, Aid Agencies Turn To Building Up Health Systems

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