Nurith Aizenman
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Nurith Aizenman

New Respiratory Virus In China Raises A Lot Of Questions

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3 U.S. Airports Will Screen Travelers From Chinese City For New Coronavirus

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United Nations peacekeepers stand next to a patient during a visit of the U.N. secretary-general at an Ebola treatment center in Mangina, North Kivu province, last September. Alexis Huguet /AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Alexis Huguet /AFP via Getty Images

Ebola Flares Up Amid Attacks On Health Workers In Congo

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Denis Otieno and his daughter plant a cypress sapling purchased with money received from the charity GiveDirectly back in 2017. More recently, the charity teamed up with researchers to study the impact of cash grants on the wider community. Nichole Sobecki for NPR hide caption

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Nichole Sobecki for NPR

Researchers Find A Remarkable Ripple Effect When You Give Cash To Poor Families

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WHO, UNICEF Evacuate Some Staff In Congolese City Of Beni

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Why Cash Aid Distributions Have A Beneficial Ripple Effect

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Ronald Mutyaba, an auto mechanic, at his home in Kampala, Uganda. Mutyaba is HIV positive and has developed Karposi sarcoma, a type of cancer that often affects people with immune deficiencies. He is holding a bottle of the liquid morphine that nurses from the nonprofit group Hospice Africa have prescribed to help control the pain caused by his illlness. Nurith Aizenman/NPR hide caption

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Nurith Aizenman/NPR

A Sip Of Morphine: Uganda's Old-School Solution To A Shortage Of Painkillers

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Uganda Finds A Solution For Painkiller Shortage

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A Juul starter kit sold at a kiosk in a mall in Makati City in the Philippines. Carlo Gabuco for NPR hide caption

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Carlo Gabuco for NPR

Juul Is Behaving Differently In The Philippines Than In The U.S., Say Activists

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Renee Bach, 30, is being sued in Ugandan civil court over the deaths of children who were treated at the critical care center she ran in Uganda. She has left Uganda and is now living in Bedford County, Virginia, where she grew up. Julia Rendleman/for NPR hide caption

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Julia Rendleman/for NPR

American With No Medical Training Ran Center For Malnourished Ugandan Kids. 105 Died

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WHO Says Ebola Is Now A 'Public Health Emergency Of International Concern'

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