Nurith Aizenman
Nurith Aizenman, photographed for NPR, 11 March 2020, in Washington DC.
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Nurith Aizenman

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Dr. Gabriela Kucharski is the secretary of health for Toledo, a city in southwestern Brazil. Amid the worst of the pandemic, she convinced Pfizer to choose Toledo for an experiment that would provide free COVID vaccines for every resident. Ian Cheibub for NPR hide caption

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Ian Cheibub for NPR

How this Brazilian doc got nearly every person in her city to take a COVID vaccine

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A women holds a child in the alley of a slum in Dhaka, Bangladesh, a country where poverty persists even as average incomes rise. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

the Imvanex vaccine, used against monkeypox and often referred to as JYNNEOS, is manufactured by only one company: Denmark-based Bavarian Nordic. Global supplies are limited. Africa, where the current outbreak began, is shut out. Alain Jocard/Pool/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Alain Jocard/Pool/AFP via Getty Images

Is there enough monkeypox vaccine to go around? Maybe yes, more likely no

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Patricia Neves (left) and Ana Paula Ano Bom helped launch a global project to revolutionize access to mRNA technology. Ian Cheibub for NPR hide caption

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Ian Cheibub for NPR

Brazilian scientist Sotiris Missailidis heads research and development at his country's premier agency for vaccine development, the Bio-Manguinhos Fiocruz Foundation. He's been a key advocate for shifting Brazil's strategy toward inventing its own vaccines. Ian Cheibub for NPR hide caption

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Ian Cheibub for NPR

A dire moment in the pandemic ... was the chance he'd been waiting for

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Patricia Neves (left) and Ana Paula Ano Bom take a break at the institute in Rio de Janeiro where they work. The two scientists say they've been inseparable since they met in college. Now their friendship has made it possible to launch a remarkable partnership to make mRNA vaccines accessible to the world. Ian Cheibub for NPR hide caption

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Ian Cheibub for NPR

These Brazilian besties are inventing an mRNA vaccine as a gift to the world

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Romie Perez and Elia Zamarripa at Perez's house. The two are among the many holding impromptu cookouts to make meals for the families of the victims. Nurith Aizenman/NPR hide caption

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In Uvalde, tragedy and food bring a community together

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An update on the global COVID-19 vaccination effort

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Volunteers unload food aid in Chena, Ethiopia, one of many parts of the world where conflict has fueled hunger. Jemal Countess/Getty Images hide caption

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Jemal Countess/Getty Images

Ukraine crisis raises question: Does food aid go equally to 'Black and white lives'?

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The impact of the war in Ukraine on the global food supply

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Nick Underwood/NPR

The goal: Vaccinate 70% of the world against COVID. Scientists are proposing a reboot

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It may be time to refocus the goal of vaccinating 70% of every country, advocates say

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A driver sits in the cab of a combine harvester during the summer harvest in a field of wheat in Varva, Ukraine. Ukraine accounts for more than 10% of the global wheat market. Russia's war threatens to disrupt the spring planting season. Vincent Mundy/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Vincent Mundy/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Russia's war on Ukraine is dire for world hunger. But there are solutions

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Global health champion Paul Farmer dies at 62

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Dr. Paul Farmer, photographed in 2017 at a screening of a film about his life's work, Bending the Arc. Desiree Navarro/Getty Images hide caption

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Desiree Navarro/Getty Images

Global health champion Dr. Paul Farmer has died

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