Nurith Aizenman
Nurith Aizenman, photographed for NPR, 11 March 2020, in Washington DC.
Stories By

Nurith Aizenman

Story Archive

A bishop receives a vaccine for COVID-19 at Juba Teaching Hospital on April 7 in Juba, South Sudan. South Sudan received 132,000 doses of the Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccine on March 25 through the World Health Organization's COVAX program to ensure all countries have equal access to vaccines. Andreea Campeanu/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Andreea Campeanu/Getty Images

They Desperately Need COVID Vaccines. So Why Are Some Countries Throwing Out Doses?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/991684096/993982535" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Africa Faces Vaccine Shortage, Challenges Administering Doses

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/993754383/993754384" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A scientist works on COVID-19 samples to find variations of the virus at the Croix-Rousse Hospital laboratory in Lyon, France, in January. Jeff Pachoud/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Jeff Pachoud/AFP via Getty Images

Can Vaccines Stop Variants? Here's What We Know So Far

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/985745837/985762573" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

COVID-19 Vaccines Vs. COVID-19 Variants

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/985475607/985475608" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Thulja Hurkchand as a young woman and with her son Hitesh. She'd tell him, "Don't worry. It's going to be okay. I'm going to be okay." Yet in the face of the pandemic, he couldn't help but worry. Family Photos hide caption

toggle caption
Family Photos

He Hoped He Could Get His Mom A Vaccine. Then Came The Call: She Had COVID

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/971367582/972409700" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A Look At The Inequities Around The COVID-19 Vaccine In South Africa

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/967458774/967458775" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

South Africa Halts AstraZeneca's COVID-19 Vaccine Distribution

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/965261715/965261716" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Researchers' New Model Predicts Number Of People Currently Contagious With COVID-19

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/964358098/964358099" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

World Health Organization Director-General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus was one of many global health leaders who spoke bluntly about the coronavirus pandemic at annual meetings that conclude on Tuesday. Discussing the lack of priority given to vaccines for poor countries, he stated, "The world is on the brink of a catastrophic moral failure." Fabrice Coffrini/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Fabrice Coffrini/AFP via Getty Images

Back To The Beginning Of The Coronavirus Pandemic

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/952445574/952445575" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Chinese travelers at a railway station in Beijing, China, wear face masks to protect themselves from the new coronavirus on Jan. 21, 2020. The virus was first identified in Wuhan, China, in Dec. 2019, and since then has quickly spread worldwide. Kevin Frayer/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Kevin Frayer/Getty Images

An older sister in Kenya carries her baby sibling. A new study looks at the impact of a big sister's caregiving. Wendy Stone/Corbis via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Wendy Stone/Corbis via Getty Images

The Secret To Success? Having A Big Sister

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/947566797/947614320" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

What Impact Can Having An Older Sister Have On A Child's Development?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/947027225/947027226" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript