Nurith Aizenman

Nurith Aizenman

Story Archive

A Pakistani policeman guards a team of polio vaccinators during an immunization drive in Karachi on January 22. Officials have stepped up protection in the wake of the January 18 attack. Rizwan Tabassum/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Rizwan Tabassum/AFP/Getty Images

A Salvadoran man reads a newspaper at a market in San Salvador on January 8. The newspaper headline reads: "The United States will decide today the future of TPS." Salvador Melendez/AP hide caption

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Salvador Melendez/AP

What You May Not Realize About The End Of TPS Status For Salvadorans

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U.S. Decision To End Salvadorans' Status Reverberates Through El Salvador

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These are some of the books from the study. From left: The Cat That Eats Letters by Ge Jing. The Foolish Old Man Who Removed The Mountain by Cai Feng. The Jar of Happiness by Aisla Burrows. from left: Shandong Education Press; Shanghai people's Fine Arts Publishing House; Child's Play International. hide caption

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from left: Shandong Education Press; Shanghai people's Fine Arts Publishing House; Child's Play International.

What's The Difference Between Children's Books In China And The U.S.?

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Sally Deng for NPR

Want To Help Someone In A Poor Village? Give Them A Bus Ticket Out

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Standing on the bench, new girl Ericka is portrayed by Nabiyah Be. Ericka is from Ohio and she's biracial. Her lighter skin puts her in the lead when a recruiter for the Miss Ghana pageant comes calling. Joan Marcus hide caption

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Joan Marcus

'African Mean Girls' Are The Toast Of New York Theater

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Women line up to vaccinate their children in Kitahurira village, Uganda. Andrew Aitchison/Corbis via Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Aitchison/Corbis via Getty Images

Health Care Costs Push A Staggering Number Of People Into Extreme Poverty

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A Bangladeshi child works in a brick-breaking yard in Dhaka, Bangladesh. The broken bricks are mixed in with concrete. Typically working barefoot and with rough utensils, a child worker earns less than $2 a day. Mehedi Hasan/NurPhoto via Getty Images hide caption

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Mehedi Hasan/NurPhoto via Getty Images