Jacob Goldstein Jacob Goldstein is an NPR correspondent and co-host of the Planet Money podcast.
Stories By

Jacob Goldstein

Jacob Goldstein

Correspondent and Co-Host, Planet Money

Jacob Goldstein is an NPR correspondent and co-host of the Planet Money podcast.

Goldstein's interest in technology and the changing nature of work has led him to stories on UPS, the Luddites, and the history of light. His aversion to paying retail has led him to stories on Costco, Spirit Airlines, and index funds.

He also contributed to the Planet Money T-shirt and oil projects, and to an episode of This American Life that asked: What is money? Ira Glass called it "the most stoner question" ever posed on the show. Goldstein is now at work on a book on the history of money.

Before coming to NPR, Goldstein was a staff writer at the Wall Street Journal, the Miami Herald, and the Bozeman Daily Chronicle. He has also written for the New York Times Magazine. He has a bachelor's degree in English from Stanford and a master's in journalism from Columbia.

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Story Archive

Nick Fountain/NPR

Episode 998: Journey To The Center Of The Fed

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All pipelines lead to Cushing. Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Episode 993: Negative Oil

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Ted Spiegel/Corbis via Getty Images

Episode 989: What If No One Pays Rent?

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The U.S. Capitol stands past a pedestrian crossing Pennsylvania Avenue in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Wednesday, March 25, 2020. Shortly after midnight today, the White House and Democratic lawmakers said they reached agreement on a $2 trillion bill aimed at limiting the economic hit of the coronavirus outbreak. Photographer: Al Drago/Bloomberg via Getty Images Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Episode 985: Where Do We Get $2,000,000,000,000?

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Episode 982: How To Save The Economy Now

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ERIC BARADAT/AFP via Getty Images

Episode 980: The Fed Fights The Virus

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Episode 978: Coronavirus, Oil, and Kansas

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Giordano Poloni/Getty Images/Ikon Images

Episode 772: Small Change

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Craig Huey/©2020 American Economic Association

Episode 963: 13,000 Economists. 1 Question.

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Quoctrung Bui

Episode 961: The Rest Of The Story, 2019

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Captain Edward Teach or Thatch, who died in 1718, was also known as the pirate Blackbeard, circa 1715. Original Publication: People Disc - HH0451 (Photo by Hulton Archive/Getty Images) Hulton Archive/Getty Images hide caption

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Hulton Archive/Getty Images

Episode 955: Pirate Videos

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Supreme Court Hears Case Involving Blackbeard's Ship, State And Property Rights

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The Planet Money peacock pie, in all its glory. Cameron Robert/NPR hide caption

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Cameron Robert/NPR

Episode 674: We Cooked A Peacock

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