Elissa Nadworny Elissa Nadworny reports and edits for the NPR Ed Team.
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Elissa Nadworny

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Elissa
Wanyu Zhang/NPR

Elissa Nadworny

Reporter/Editor, NPR Ed

Elissa Nadworny covers higher education and college access for NPR. She's led the NPR Ed team's multiplatform storytelling – incorporating radio, print, comics, photojournalism, and video into the coverage of education. In 2017, that work won an Edward R. Murrow Award for excellence in innovation. As an education reporter for NPR, she's covered many education topics, including new education research, chronic absenteeism, and some fun deep-dives into the most popular high school plays and musicals and the history behind a classroom skeleton.

After the 2016 election, she traveled with Melissa Block across the U.S. for series "Our Land." They reported from communities large and small, capturing how people's identities are shaped by where they live.

Prior to coming to NPR, Nadworny worked at Bloomberg News, reporting from the White House. A recipient of the McCormick National Security Journalism Scholarship, she spent four months reporting on U.S. international food aid for USA Today, traveling to Jordan to talk with Syrian refugees about food programs there. In addition to USA Today, she's written stories for Dow Jones' MarketWatch, the Chicago Tribune, the Miami Herald and McClatchy DC.

A native of Erie, Pennsylvania, Nadworny has a bachelor's degree in documentary film from Skidmore College and a master's degree in journalism from Northwestern University's Medill School of Journalism.

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Story Archive

Nathan Grebil takes the temperature of a fourth-grader during a health screening in October at Bel Aire Elementary School in Tiburon, Calif. Lea Suzuki/San Francisco Chronicle via Getty Images hide caption

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Lea Suzuki/San Francisco Chronicle via Getty Images

Nearly 200,000 flags on the National Mall represent the thousands of people who cannot attend the inauguration because of the pandemic and tight security in the nation's capital. Susan Walsh /AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Susan Walsh /AFP via Getty Images
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Didn't Get Enough Financial Aid For College? You Can Ask For More Money

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What Will Congress and Education Policy Look Like Under Joe Biden?

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Miguel Cardona, President-elect Joe Biden's intended nominee for education secretary, speaks Wednesday in Wilmington, Del. Carolyn Kaster/AP hide caption

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Carolyn Kaster/AP

A 'Real Easy' Choice: Biden Introduces Education Pick Miguel Cardona

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Biden To Pick Miguel Cardona To Be Next Secretary Of Education

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Connecticut Education Commissioner Miguel Cardona, here in January, is President-elect Joe Biden's intended nominee for education secretary. Devin Leith-Yessian/Record-Journal via AP hide caption

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Devin Leith-Yessian/Record-Journal via AP

Biden Picks Connecticut Schools Chief Miguel Cardona As Education Secretary

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In a bipartisan effort, Congress is close to a deal to simplify the federal financial aid form, or FAFSA, a major policy goal of retiring Republican senator Lamar Alexander. Samuel Corum/Getty Images hide caption

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Samuel Corum/Getty Images

Instead of going to college this fall, Brian Williams got a job at a Jimmy John's near his home in Stafford, Texas. He says paying for college was always going to be hard, but it was even harder to justify the expense during a pandemic. Scott Dalton for NPR hide caption

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Scott Dalton for NPR

'Losing A Generation': Fall College Enrollment Plummets For 1st-Year Students

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Education Secretary Betsy DeVos appears in Phoenix in October. On Friday, the Education Department announced an extension of pandemic relief measures for federal student loan borrowers. Matt York/AP hide caption

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Matt York/AP

Education Department Extends Student Loan Payment Freeze Through January

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Shelby Dorsey, a contact tracer and a senior studying theater at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, makes calls at the local public health department. "Were not here to chastise," she says, "we're here to help." Elissa Nadworny/NPR hide caption

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Elissa Nadworny/NPR

With Cases Surging, Colleges Turn To Students For Help

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