Elissa Nadworny Elissa Nadworny reports and edits for the NPR Ed Team.
Elissa
Stories By

Elissa Nadworny

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Elissa
Wanyu Zhang/NPR

Elissa Nadworny

Correspondent, Higher Education

Elissa Nadworny is an NPR Correspondent, covering higher education.

In 2022 she spent several months in Ukraine covering the war with Russia, with a special focus on the effect of war on children and families.

She also guest hosts NPR shows such as All Things Considered and Weekend Edition.

In 2020 she traveled to dozens of college campuses to document what it was like to reopen during the height of the coronavirus pandemic. Her work has won several awards including a 2018 James Beard Award for a story about the Chinese-American population in the Mississippi Delta, a 2017 Edward R. Murrow Award for excellence in innovation and a 2020 Gracie Award for a story about student parents in college,

Some favorite story experiences include embedding with a class of college students getting their degrees from inside a state prison, crawling in the sewers below a college campus to test wastewater for the coronavirus and sitting with the elderly living along the front lines in Ukraine's east. In 2018, she went on an epic search for the history behind her own high school's classroom skeleton.

Before joining NPR in 2014, Nadworny worked at Bloomberg News, reporting from the White House. A recipient of the McCormick National Security Journalism Scholarship, she spent four months reporting on U.S. international food aid for USA Today, traveling to Jordan to talk with Syrian refugees about food programs there.

Originally from Erie, Pa., Nadworny has a bachelor's degree in documentary film from Skidmore College and a master's degree in journalism from Northwestern University's Medill School of Journalism.

Story Archive

Saturday

An elderly couple in Ukraine says their resilience is all about happiness

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Sunday

Saturday

A tradition of plunging in an icy river persists in Ukraine, despite the war

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Thursday

Nikolai Pastuchenko crosses himself as he takes a dip into the Dnipro River in Dnipro, Ukraine, on Thursday. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

A tradition of plunging in an icy river persists in Ukraine, despite the war

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Wednesday

Monday

A soldier stares up at a gaping hole in an apartment building in Dnipro, Ukraine on Monday. The city was hit by Russian missiles on Saturday. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Amid the rubble in Dnipro, Ukraine, a frantic search grows increasingly desperate

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Sunday

Friday

Wednesday

During the pandemic many Americans chose not to go to college, but high schoolers did

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Russia makes a tactical advance in Bakhmut in eastern Ukraine

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Monday

During the pandemic many Americans chose not to go to college, but high schoolers did

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Sunday

Saturday

Monday

As a prospective college student, McKenna Hensley had to wade through confusing and hard-to-compare financial aid letters, trying to understand which college she could afford. Elissa Nadworny/NPR hide caption

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College aid letters are misleading students and need a legal fix

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