Elissa Nadworny Elissa Nadworny reports and edits for the NPR Ed Team.
Elissa
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Elissa Nadworny

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Elissa
Wanyu Zhang/NPR

Elissa Nadworny

Reporter/Editor, NPR Ed

Elissa Nadworny covers higher education and college access for NPR. She's led the NPR Ed team's multiplatform storytelling – incorporating radio, print, comics, photojournalism, and video into the coverage of education. In 2017, that work won an Edward R. Murrow Award for excellence in innovation. As an education reporter for NPR, she's covered many education topics, including new education research, chronic absenteeism, and some fun deep-dives into the most popular high school plays and musicals and the history behind a classroom skeleton.

After the 2016 election, she traveled with Melissa Block across the U.S. for series "Our Land." They reported from communities large and small, capturing how people's identities are shaped by where they live.

Prior to coming to NPR, Nadworny worked at Bloomberg News, reporting from the White House. A recipient of the McCormick National Security Journalism Scholarship, she spent four months reporting on U.S. international food aid for USA Today, traveling to Jordan to talk with Syrian refugees about food programs there. In addition to USA Today, she's written stories for Dow Jones' MarketWatch, the Chicago Tribune, the Miami Herald and McClatchy DC.

A native of Erie, Pennsylvania, Nadworny has a bachelor's degree in documentary film from Skidmore College and a master's degree in journalism from Northwestern University's Medill School of Journalism.

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Story Archive

The Show Must Go On: Rankings Are Out For High School Musicals, Plays

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The Most Popular High School Plays And Musicals

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Suharu Ogawa for NPR

Colleges Spent Months Planning For Fall, But A COVID-19 Surge Is Changing Everything

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ICE To Rescind Regulations Regarding International Students

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U.S. Rule Blocking Some International Students Gets Pushback

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Interested Parties Watch To See If U.S. Schools Reopen For Fall Semester

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Anke Gladnick for NPR

The Wild Card For An In-Person Fall: College Student Behavior

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As Colleges Make Plans For Fall, More Young People Are Getting COVID-19

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Amiri Nash, 18, co-founded an organization that creates signs about racial injustice to post in predominantly white neighborhoods. Elissa Nadworny/NPR hide caption

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Elissa Nadworny/NPR

U.S. Education Secretary Betsy DeVos appeared on Capitol Hill in February, just weeks before the pandemic sent the economy reeling. The Education Department recently changed its guidance around reconsidering student financial aid awards. Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

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Alex Brandon/AP

Education Dept. Is Making It Harder For Colleges To Boost Student Aid During Crisis

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Students behind the Flossy Podcast: Joshua Bovell, Jaheim Birch-Gentles, Brianna Johnson, Jamar Thompson, Ieszan McKinney, and Kamari Murdock in Canarsie, Brooklyn, N.Y. (Not pictured - Isaiah Dupuy) Kholood Eid for NPR hide caption

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'Climate Change Is Racial Injustice': Students Speak Their Truth In Winning Podcast

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Franziska Barczyk for NPR

Colleges Are Backing Off SAT, ACT Scores — But The Exams Will Be Hard To Shake

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More Colleges Making Standardized Test Scores Optional For Upcoming School Year

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