Elissa Nadworny Elissa Nadworny reports and edits for the NPR Ed Team.
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Elissa Nadworny

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Elissa Nadworny
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Elissa Nadworny

Reporter/Editor, NPR Ed

Elissa Nadworny covers higher education and college access for NPR. She's led the NPR Ed team's multiplatform storytelling – incorporating radio, print, comics, photojournalism, and video into the coverage of education. In 2017, that work won an Edward R. Murrow Award for excellence in innovation. As an education reporter for NPR, she's covered many education topics, including new education research, chronic absenteeism, and some fun deep-dives into the most popular high school plays and musicals and the history behind a classroom skeleton.

After the 2016 election, she traveled with Melissa Block across the U.S. for series "Our Land." They reported from communities large and small, capturing how people's identities are shaped by where they live.

Prior to coming to NPR, Nadworny worked at Bloomberg News, reporting from the White House. A recipient of the McCormick National Security Journalism Scholarship, she spent four months reporting on U.S. international food aid for USA Today, traveling to Jordan to talk with Syrian refugees about food programs there. In addition to USA Today, she's written stories for Dow Jones' MarketWatch, the Chicago Tribune, the Miami Herald and McClatchy DC.

A native of Erie, Pennsylvania, Nadworny has a bachelor's degree in documentary film from Skidmore College and a master's degree in journalism from Northwestern University's Medill School of Journalism.

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Story Archive

Students Provide Guides For Paying For College

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English teacher Shehtaz Huq and the eighth-graders at Bronx Prep Middle School behind the winning podcast — Sssh! Periods. Elissa Nadworny/NPR hide caption

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Periods! Why These 8th-Graders Aren't Afraid To Talk About Them

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Changing How You Think Helps The Transition From Prisoner Back To Citizen

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"It motivated me more to finish," Parks says, reflecting on college life with Caleb. "It wasn't like, 'oh man he's gonna slow me down.' I don't want him to feel like he held me back from anything, because he didn't." Elissa Nadworny/NPR hide caption

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'Do They Kick Out Pregnant People?' Navigating College With Kids

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California Programs Helps People On Parole To Function In Society

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'It Motivated Me': 4 Million College Students Are Raising Children

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Congress Considers Making College More Accessible To People In Prison

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Students perform in Granite Bay High School's original production of Ranked. Yarcenia Garcia/Courtesy of Granite Bay High School hide caption

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A Dystopian High School Musical Foresaw The College Admissions Scandal

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McKenna Hensley got into 10 colleges — each with its own distinctive financial aid offer. "It was very confusing," she says. "It makes a difference when you're paying yourself. You have to be extra careful." Elissa Nadworny/NPR hide caption

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Confused By Your College Financial Aid Letter? You're Not Alone

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14 People Who Pleaded Guilty Face Prison Time In College Admissions Case

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