Elissa Nadworny Elissa Nadworny reports and edits for the NPR Ed Team.
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Elissa Nadworny

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Elissa Nadworny
Ariel Zambelich/NPR

Elissa Nadworny

Reporter/Editor, NPR Ed

Elissa Nadworny covers higher education and college access for NPR. She's led the NPR Ed team's multiplatform storytelling – incorporating radio, print, comics, photojournalism, and video into the coverage of education. In 2017, that work won an Edward R. Murrow Award for excellence in innovation. As an education reporter for NPR, she's covered many education topics, including new education research, chronic absenteeism, and some fun deep-dives into the most popular high school plays and musicals and the history behind a classroom skeleton.

After the 2016 election, she traveled with Melissa Block across the U.S. for series "Our Land." They reported from communities large and small, capturing how people's identities are shaped by where they live.

Prior to coming to NPR, Nadworny worked at Bloomberg News, reporting from the White House. A recipient of the McCormick National Security Journalism Scholarship, she spent four months reporting on U.S. international food aid for USA Today, traveling to Jordan to talk with Syrian refugees about food programs there. In addition to USA Today, she's written stories for Dow Jones' MarketWatch, the Chicago Tribune, the Miami Herald and McClatchy DC.

A native of Erie, Pennsylvania, Nadworny has a bachelor's degree in documentary film from Skidmore College and a master's degree in journalism from Northwestern University's Medill School of Journalism.

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Story Archive

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Does It Matter Where You Go To College? Some Context For The Admissions Scandal

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For some older college students, studying later in life has its advantages: They have skills and tools that could only have come with age and maturity. (Clockwise from top left: Santa Benavidez Ramirez, Liz Bracken, Taryn Jim, Matt Seo, Sakeenah Shakir, Jarrell Harris) NPR hide caption

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NPR

Kelcei Williams says Year Up helped her realize that her previous jobs actually gave her a bunch of transferable skills. She's a team leader. She learns fast. And she can solve problems on the spot. Amr Alfiky/NPR hide caption

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Amr Alfiky/NPR

Resume Issues? Need An Internship? This Organization Can Help

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Principal Brian McCann sings a snow-day tune in Swansea, Mass. YouTube hide caption

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YouTube

When The Principal Cancels School ... With A Song-And-Dance Number

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Classrooms at Vista Middle School sit empty on the second day of the Los Angeles teacher strike. Roxanne Turpen for NPR hide caption

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Roxanne Turpen for NPR

Movies, Worksheets, Computer Time: Inside LA Schools During The Teacher Strike

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A demonstrator outside Hollenbeck Middle School in Boyle Heights, Los Angeles, flashes a friendly smile to passersby. Roxanne Turpen for NPR hide caption

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Roxanne Turpen for NPR

Under Rainy Skies, Los Angeles Teachers Take To The Picket Lines

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Educators from Hollenbeck Middle School in Boyle Heights, Los Angeles chant, "Teachers united will never be defeated!" in front of their school. Roxanne Turpen for NPR hide caption

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Roxanne Turpen for NPR

LA Students Prep For A Teacher Strike Monday: 'It's So Much Bigger Than A Pay Raise'

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