Elissa Nadworny Elissa Nadworny reports and edits for the NPR Ed Team.
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Elissa Nadworny

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Elissa
Wanyu Zhang/NPR

Elissa Nadworny

Reporter/Editor, NPR Ed

Elissa Nadworny covers higher education and college access for NPR. She's led the NPR Ed team's multiplatform storytelling – incorporating radio, print, comics, photojournalism, and video into the coverage of education. In 2017, that work won an Edward R. Murrow Award for excellence in innovation. As an education reporter for NPR, she's covered many education topics, including new education research, chronic absenteeism, and some fun deep-dives into the most popular high school plays and musicals and the history behind a classroom skeleton.

After the 2016 election, she traveled with Melissa Block across the U.S. for series "Our Land." They reported from communities large and small, capturing how people's identities are shaped by where they live.

Prior to coming to NPR, Nadworny worked at Bloomberg News, reporting from the White House. A recipient of the McCormick National Security Journalism Scholarship, she spent four months reporting on U.S. international food aid for USA Today, traveling to Jordan to talk with Syrian refugees about food programs there. In addition to USA Today, she's written stories for Dow Jones' MarketWatch, the Chicago Tribune, the Miami Herald and McClatchy DC.

A native of Erie, Pennsylvania, Nadworny has a bachelor's degree in documentary film from Skidmore College and a master's degree in journalism from Northwestern University's Medill School of Journalism.

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Story Archive

Students chat on a lawn this fall at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. It's unclear how disruptions to campus life during the pandemic might affect student voter turnout on Election Day. Elissa Nadworny/NPR hide caption

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Elissa Nadworny/NPR

In Fort Collins, Colorado State University has been running a robust wastewater testing program since the start of the fall semester. Researchers regularly collect samples from 17 sites across campus, including the Westfall Hall dormitory. Elissa Nadworny/NPR hide caption

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Colleges Turn To Wastewater Testing In An Effort To Flush Out The Coronavirus

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Cha Pornea for NPR

FAFSA Applications Are Open. Here's How To Fill It Out This Year

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Emily Garti, a junior studying nutrition, gets her twice-weekly COVID-19 test at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Elissa Nadworny/NPR hide caption

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The Tricky Business Of Coronavirus Testing On College Campuses

We hit the road with NPR Education Reporter Elissa Nadworny. She's been on a weekslong road trip to get an up-close view of how colleges across the U.S. are handling the pandemic. On today's show, she tells us how one university has been using mass testing to fight the spread of the coronavirus on its campus. It's a strategy that's run into some challenges, namely, student behavior.

The Tricky Business Of Coronavirus Testing On College Campuses

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Even In COVID-19 Hot Spots, Many Colleges Aren't Aggressively Testing Students

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Many Colleges Aren't Aggressively Testing Students For Coronavirus

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Students at Grand Rapids Community College pass out T-shirts to promote virtual student life offerings during the fall semester. Elissa Nadworny/NPR hide caption

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Fewer Students Are Going To Community College, Despite High Unemployment

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New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio, shown here last month in Brooklyn, says that he and employees in his office will take furloughs to reduce costs. John Minchillo/AP hide caption

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College Towns Welcome Students Back But Worry COVID-19 Tags Along

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2 Michigan Colleges Face Coronavirus Outbreaks In The 1st Week Of School

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