Rebecca Hersher Rebecca Hersher is a reporter on NPR's Science Desk.
Rebecca Hersher at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., July 25, 2018. (photo by Allison Shelley) (Square)
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Rebecca Hersher

Allison Shelley/NPR
Rebecca Hersher at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., July 25, 2018. (photo by Allison Shelley)
Allison Shelley/NPR

Rebecca Hersher

Reporter, Science Desk

Rebecca Hersher is a reporter on NPR's Science Desk, where she reports on outbreaks, natural disasters, and environmental and health research. Since coming to NPR in 2011, she has covered the Ebola outbreak in West Africa, embedded with the Afghan army after the American combat mission ended, and reported on floods and hurricanes in the U.S. She's also reported on research about puppies. Before her work on the Science Desk, she was a producer for NPR's Weekend All Things Considered in Los Angeles.

Hersher was part of the NPR team that won a Peabody award for coverage of the Ebola epidemic in West Africa, and produced a story from Liberia that won an Edward R. Murrow award for use of sound. She was a finalist for the 2017 Daniel Schorr prize; a 2017 Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting fellow, reporting on sanitation in Haiti; and a 2015 NPR Above the Fray fellow, investigating the causes of the suicide epidemic in Greenland.

Prior to working at NPR, Hersher reported on biomedical research and pharmaceutical news for Nature Medicine.

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A map shows earthquake faults in part of Southern California. Scientists using hundreds of graphics processors found that the region experienced 1.81 million temblors over a decade-long span — 10 times more than what had previously been detected. Rich Pedroncelli/AP hide caption

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Rich Pedroncelli/AP

Flames creep along the cedar siding on a test house hit by blown embers at a research facility run by the Insurance Institute for Business & Home Safety. Ryan Kellman/NPR hide caption

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Ryan Kellman/NPR

Step 1: Build A House. Step 2: Set It On Fire

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Smog fills Utah's Salt Lake Valley in January 2017. Winter weather in the area often traps air pollution that is bad for public health. George Frey/Getty Images hide caption

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George Frey/Getty Images

EPA Science Panel Considering Guidelines That Upend Basic Air Pollution Science

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A satellite image from Wednesday morning shows a powerful storm system heading east across the U.S. The storm is expected to bring high winds, snow and rain to much of the central U.S. in the coming days. GOES-East/NOAA hide caption

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GOES-East/NOAA

Minorities Likely To Receive Less Disaster Aid Than White Americans

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A boy rides his bike through still water after a thunderstorm in the Lakewood area of East Houston, which flooded during Hurricane Harvey. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

How Federal Disaster Money Favors The Rich

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Congressional Democrats Say Climate Change Is A Priority As They Control The House

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Lake Elsinore, Calif., was drenched Thursday by a storm that dropped rain and snow across much of the state. The National Weather Service is providing forecasts and warnings as usual, but employees are working without pay. Jae C. Hong/AP hide caption

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Jae C. Hong/AP

Back-To-Back Storms And No Pay For Federal Weather Forecasters

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Shutdown Puts Work On Hold For Researchers Collaborating With Government Scientists

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Michal Kurtyka, the Polish official who led U.N. climate change negotiations in Katowice, Poland. On Dec. 15., nearly 200 countries agreed to a set of rules that will implement the landmark Paris agreement. Czarek Sokolowski/AP hide caption

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Czarek Sokolowski/AP