Rebecca Hersher Rebecca Hersher is a reporter on NPR's Science Desk.
Rebecca Hersher at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., July 25, 2018. (photo by Allison Shelley) (Square)
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Rebecca Hersher

Homes that were sold by the Department of Housing and Urban Development between January 2017 and August 2020 are in federally designated flood zones at almost 75 times the rate of all homes sold nationwide in that period. New Jersey is one hot spot. Here, flooding from Tropical Storm Henri in Helmetta, N.J., this August. Tayfun Coskun/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images hide caption

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Tayfun Coskun/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

The Federal Government Sells Flood-Prone Homes To Often Unsuspecting Buyers, NPR Finds

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A new study finds that common climate change terms can be confusing to the public. That includes phrases that describe the transition from fossil fuels to cleaner sources of energy. Here, wind turbines operate near a coal-fired power plant in Germany. Ina Fassbender /AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Ina Fassbender /AFP via Getty Images

Rescuers carry a boat into the subway in Zhengzhou, China, in July after flash floods trapped passengers underground. STR/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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STR/AFP via Getty Images

NYC's Subway Flooding Isn't A Fluke. It's The Reality For Cities In A Warming World

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A woman surveys damage Monday from Hurricane Ida in a neighborhood in Kenner, La. The storm was fueled by abnormally warm water in the Gulf of Mexico. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Olson/Getty Images

How Climate Change Is Fueling Hurricanes Like Ida

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Debris could be seen piled up in Waverly, Tenn., on Sunday after heavy weekend rains caused deadly flash flooding. Climate change is driving more torrential rain around the world. Mark Humphrey/AP hide caption

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Mark Humphrey/AP

The Floods In Tennessee Aren't Freak Accidents. They're A New Reality

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People evacuate from a wildfire north of Athens, Greece, on Friday. A climate-driven heat wave helped create conditions for the fire to burn out of control. Scientists warn that humans are running out of time to curb greenhouse gas emissions and avoid catastrophic global warming. Thodoris Nikolaou/AP hide caption

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Thodoris Nikolaou/AP

A Major Report Warns Climate Change Is Accelerating And Humans Must Cut Emissions Now

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How Climate Change Is Driving Extreme Weather

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A wind farm in Wyoming generates electricity for a region that used to be more dependent on coal-fired power plants. A new study finds that millions of lives could be saved this century by rapidly reducing greenhouse gas emissions. Matt Young/AP hide caption

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Matt Young/AP

Volunteers fight a wildfire in northeastern Siberia on July 17th. Heat waves in the Russian Arctic and boreal forests have fueled intense, widespread blazes that can damage trees and release enormous amounts of stored carbon dioxide from forests and permafrost. Ivan Nikiforov/AP hide caption

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Ivan Nikiforov/AP

Climate Scientists Meet As Floods, Fires, Droughts And Heat Waves Batter Countries

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Streets and homes flooded in Newport Beach, Calif., during a high tide in July 2020. So-called sunny day floods are getting more common in coastal cities and towns as sea levels rise due to climate change. Matt Hartman/AP hide caption

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Matt Hartman/AP

A reconstructed Neanderthal skeleton (right) and a modern-human version of a skeleton are displayed at the American Museum of Natural History in New York in 2003. A new study confirms that early humans who lived in colder places adapted to have larger bodies. Frank Franklin II/AP hide caption

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Frank Franklin II/AP

Lower-Income Survivors Are Less Likely To Get FEMA Aid After Disaster, Documents Show

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Timothy Dominique, 62, lives in a donated RV parked next door to the family home where he was staying when Hurricane Laura hit Lake Charles last year. He says he received nothing from FEMA because he does not own the home and didn't have a formal rental agreement. Ryan Kellman/NPR hide caption

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Ryan Kellman/NPR

Why FEMA Aid Is Unavailable To Many Who Need It The Most

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Hurricane Irma damaged homes in the Florida Keys in 2017. A new study finds buildings in the contiguous U.S. are concentrated in disaster-prone areas. Matt McClain/AP hide caption

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Matt McClain/AP

More Than Half Of U.S. Buildings Are In Places Prone To Disaster, Study Finds

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Hurricanes, Drought And Fires: The U.S. Has An Intense Summer Ahead

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