Rebecca Hersher Rebecca Hersher is a reporter on NPR's Science Desk.
Rebecca Hersher at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., July 25, 2018. (photo by Allison Shelley) (Square)
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Rebecca Hersher

Hurricanes, Drought And Fires: The U.S. Has An Intense Summer Ahead

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Firefighters battle a brush fire last week in Santa Barbara, Calif. Climate-driven droughts make large, destructive fires more likely around the world. Scientists warn that humans are on track to cause catastrophic global warming this century. Santa Barbara County, Calif., Fire Department via AP hide caption

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Santa Barbara County, Calif., Fire Department via AP

Refrigerators on sale in 2018 in Pennsylvania. The Environmental Protection Agency is planning to phase out the use of cooling chemicals that are powerful greenhouse gases. Keith Srakocic/AP hide caption

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Keith Srakocic/AP

Tia Tate is a computational biologist currently working in a postdoctoral position at a federal agency in North Carolina. Cornell Watson for NPR hide caption

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Cornell Watson for NPR

Why Having Diverse Government Scientists Is Key To Dealing With Climate Change

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Earth's atmosphere photographed from the International Space Station. Greenhouse gases have accumulated rapidly and are trapping extra heat in the atmosphere. It will take decades for the gases to break down naturally or be reabsorbed on Earth's surface. Expedition 28 Crew/International Space Station/NASA hide caption

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Expedition 28 Crew/International Space Station/NASA

Carbon Emissions Could Plummet. The Atmosphere Will Lag Behind

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A satellite image from September 2017 shows Hurricane Irma, left, and Hurricane Jose, right, in the Atlantic Ocean. NOAA says the average annual number of tropical storms in the Atlantic has slightly increased. NOAA/GOES-16/AP hide caption

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NOAA/GOES-16/AP

A U.S. satellite captures cloud cover over North America on Monday. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration announced it has upgraded its weather forecasting model to use more satellite weather data. GOES-East CONUS/NOAA/NASA hide caption

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GOES-East CONUS/NOAA/NASA

NOAA Upgrades Forecasts As Climate Change Drives More Severe Storms

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A portion of Australia's Great Barrier Reef photographed from the International Space Station. The Flinders Reef area of the Great Barrier Reef is one of 11 sites around the world where scientists are looking for decisive geological evidence of a new epoch called the anthropocene. M. Justin Wilkinson, Texas State U., Jacobs Contract at NASA-JSC/NASA hide caption

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M. Justin Wilkinson, Texas State U., Jacobs Contract at NASA-JSC/NASA

Drawing A Line In The Mud: Scientists Debate When 'Age Of Humans' Began

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Before the flood, Aaron Trigg says, there were baseball games and kids playing on the playground near his house in Rainelle. After the flood, that changed. "Now, it was just silence," he remembers. "It affected the spirit of the town." Ryan Kellman/NPR hide caption

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Ryan Kellman/NPR

A Looming Disaster: New Data Reveal Where Flood Damage Is An Existential Threat

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Power lines near Houston on Feb. 16. Some Texas residents are facing enormous power bills after wholesale prices for electricity skyrocketed amid last week's massive grid failure. David J. Phillip/AP hide caption

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David J. Phillip/AP

ENCORE: Why Sea Level Rise Varies Across The World

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Blue tarps cover houses with damaged roofs in Lake Charles, La., after Hurricane Delta hit the city in October 2020. Bill Feig/AP hide caption

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Bill Feig/AP

Federal Scientists Confirm Virtual Tie For Hottest Year On Record

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Protesters attempt to block the delivery of toxic PCB waste to a landfill in Warren County, N.C., in 1982. It was in response to the state's decision to locate a hazardous waste landfill in a low-income, predominantly Black area of Warren County that the term "environmental racism" was first used by the Rev. Ben Chavis. Jenny Labalme hide caption

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Jenny Labalme

Hope And Skepticism As Biden Promises To Address Environmental Racism

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