Rebecca Hersher Rebecca Hersher is a reporter on NPR's Science Desk.
Rebecca Hersher at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., July 25, 2018. (photo by Allison Shelley) (Square)
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Rebecca Hersher

People wait in line for food in Sindh province, Pakistan, on Sept. 19, 2022. The province was one of the hardest hit by recent deadly floods. A new analysis confirms that climate change likely helped cause the disaster. Pervez Masih/AP hide caption

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Pervez Masih/AP

Flooding in Ocean City, N.J. in October 2020. Thousands of coastal cities around the world are already dealing with rising sea levels, and face catastrophic sea level rise if global warming triggers runaway ice melt. Wayne Parry/AP hide caption

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Wayne Parry/AP

Humans must limit warming to avoid climate tipping points, new study finds

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Adapting parks to keep them functional as the climate changes

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City parks can be wild and remote, even if they're in the backyard. Here, early morning hikers rest before walking down Piestewa Peak, one of many mountainous city parks in Phoenix. "There's, like, a 5 million-person city right there. And then you turn out here, and you could be in the high desert," says Claire Miller, a longtime park supervisor in Phoenix. Ryan Kellman/NPR hide caption

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Do animals sweat? Here's a poem to answer that question

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The new law meant to fix environmental injustices is far from equitable, critics say

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A line of petrochemical facilities in St. Charles Parish, La., in 2018. Many people who live near industrial sites, and who are exposed to dangerous pollution, fear that the Inflation Reduction Act will deepen existing environmental inequalities. Gerald Herbert/AP hide caption

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Gerald Herbert/AP

Temperatures in Longyearbyen, Norway above the Arctic Circle hit a new record above 70 degrees Fahrenheit in July 2020. The Arctic has warmed nearly four times faster than the planet as a whole since 1979, a new study finds. Sean Gallup/Getty Images hide caption

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Sean Gallup/Getty Images

The Arctic is heating up nearly four times faster than the whole planet, study finds

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High tide flooding in downtown Annapolis, Md., in 2021. The number of days with high tide flooding is accelerating on the East and Gulf coasts. Brian Witte/AP hide caption

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Floods are getting more common. Do you know your risk?

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Because of climate change, inland flooding is becoming more common

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Climate change is making extreme heat around the world more common

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Katherine Morgan wipes sweat from her forehead while walking to work during a record-breaking heat wave in Portland in 2021. Scientists say that heat wave would have been virtually impossible without human caused climate change. Nathan Howard/AP hide caption

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Researchers can now explain how climate change is affecting your weather

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Scientists are learning just how climate change impacts extreme weather events

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