Rebecca Hersher Rebecca Hersher is a reporter on NPR's Science Desk.
Rebecca Hersher at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., July 25, 2018. (photo by Allison Shelley) (Square)
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Rebecca Hersher

Allison Shelley/NPR
Rebecca Hersher at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., July 25, 2018. (photo by Allison Shelley)
Allison Shelley/NPR

Rebecca Hersher

Reporter, Science Desk

Rebecca Hersher (she/her) is a reporter on NPR's Science Desk, where she reports on outbreaks, natural disasters, and environmental and health research. Since coming to NPR in 2011, she has covered the Ebola outbreak in West Africa, embedded with the Afghan army after the American combat mission ended, and reported on floods and hurricanes in the U.S. She's also reported on research about puppies. Before her work on the Science Desk, she was a producer for NPR's Weekend All Things Considered in Los Angeles.

Hersher was part of the NPR team that won a Peabody award for coverage of the Ebola epidemic in West Africa, and produced a story from Liberia that won an Edward R. Murrow award for use of sound. She was a finalist for the 2017 Daniel Schorr prize; a 2017 Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting fellow, reporting on sanitation in Haiti; and a 2015 NPR Above the Fray fellow, investigating the causes of the suicide epidemic in Greenland.

Prior to working at NPR, Hersher reported on biomedical research and pharmaceutical news for Nature Medicine.

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Lachlan (left) and Lillian Barilleau play in the backyard of their home in Central, La. They were displaced from the house for months after a flood in 2016. Ryan Kellman/NPR hide caption

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Ryan Kellman/NPR

Living In Harm's Way: Why Most Flood Risk Is Not Disclosed

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Floods are the most deadly and expensive natural disaster in the U.S. And yet, in most parts of the country, it's easy to move into a flood-prone building and not even know you're in harm's way. Kaz Fantone/NPR hide caption

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Kaz Fantone/NPR

A truck sits in still water after Hurricane Laura swept through Cameron Parish, La. The hurricane inflicted at least $8 billion in damage to southwest Louisiana when it hit in late August. Ryan Kellman/NPR hide caption

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Ryan Kellman/NPR

A health care worker tests a patient for the coronavirus in Nevada in July. Scientists say a 25-year-old Nevada man was infected with the virus twice. It is the first confirmed case of reinfection in the U.S. John Locher/AP hide caption

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John Locher/AP

Scientists Confirm Nevada Man Was Infected Twice With Coronavirus

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What Will 2021 Hold For U.S. Climate Diplomacy?

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What Are The Costs Of Climate Change?

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The appointment of a climate change denier to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration comes as Americans face profound threats stoked by climate change, from the vast, deadly wildfires in the West to an unusually active hurricane season in the South and East. Eva Marie Uzcategui/Getty Images hide caption

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Eva Marie Uzcategui/Getty Images

Some Areas Damaged By Hurricane Laura See Spikes In Air Pollution

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Hurricane Laura caused a fire at a chemical plant owned by BioLab in Westlake, La. The plant manufactures chemicals for swimming pools. Gerald Herbert/AP hide caption

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Gerald Herbert/AP

The five largest fires in California history have occurred since 2003, a sign that climate change is making extreme wildfires more frequent. Josh Edelson/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Josh Edelson/AFP via Getty Images

Everything Is Unprecedented. Welcome To Your Hotter Earth

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Floodwaters surround a newly constructed house for sale in Maine in 2018. Realtor.com added flood risk information to the more than 100 million listings on its site. Gregory Rec/Portland Press Herald via Getty Images hide caption

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Gregory Rec/Portland Press Herald via Getty Images

Major Real Estate Website Now Shows Flood Risk. Should They All?

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