Rebecca Hersher Rebecca Hersher is a reporter on NPR's Science Desk.
Rebecca Hersher at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., July 25, 2018. (photo by Allison Shelley) (Square)
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Rebecca Hersher

Allison Shelley/NPR
Rebecca Hersher at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., July 25, 2018. (photo by Allison Shelley)
Allison Shelley/NPR

Rebecca Hersher

Reporter, Science Desk

Rebecca Hersher (she/her) is a reporter on NPR's Science Desk, where she reports on outbreaks, natural disasters, and environmental and health research. Since coming to NPR in 2011, she has covered the Ebola outbreak in West Africa, embedded with the Afghan army after the American combat mission ended, and reported on floods and hurricanes in the U.S. She's also reported on research about puppies. Before her work on the Science Desk, she was a producer for NPR's Weekend All Things Considered in Los Angeles.

Hersher was part of the NPR team that won a Peabody award for coverage of the Ebola epidemic in West Africa, and produced a story from Liberia that won an Edward R. Murrow award for use of sound. She was a finalist for the 2017 Daniel Schorr prize; a 2017 Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting fellow, reporting on sanitation in Haiti; and a 2015 NPR Above the Fray fellow, investigating the causes of the suicide epidemic in Greenland.

Prior to working at NPR, Hersher reported on biomedical research and pharmaceutical news for Nature Medicine.

Story Archive

Hurricane Ian cause wide spread flooding when it dumped rain across Florida in September. A preliminary analysis found that Ian dumped at least 10% more rain because of climate change. Joe Burbank/Orlando Sentinal/Tribune News Service via Getty hide caption

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Joe Burbank/Orlando Sentinal/Tribune News Service via Getty

Workers wait to get off an elevator at a coal mine in eastern Ukraine. Russia's invasion of Ukraine disrupted global supplies of fossil fuels and led to more reliance on coal for electricity in some countries. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

Three Takeaways From The COP27 Climate Conference

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The COP27 summit went late into overtime, with Sameh Shoukry, president of the climate summit, speaking during a closing session on Sunday. Peter Dejong/AP hide caption

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Peter Dejong/AP

Did the world make progress on climate change? Here's what was decided at global talks

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A methane flare seen in Texas. Methane is an incredibly potent greenhouse gas that is currently released in huge quantities by oil and gas operations, landfills and agriculture. Bronte Wittpenn/Bloomberg via Getty hide caption

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Bronte Wittpenn/Bloomberg via Getty

Students at the Rolwaling Sangag Choling Monastery School in Beding take a break to play volleyball in the afternoon sun. Ryan Kellman/NPR hide caption

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Ryan Kellman/NPR

'It could just sweep us away': This school is on the front lines of climate change

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President Joe Biden spoke at the COP27 climate negotiations in Egypt. The President said the United States will meet its promises to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 50% by 2030. Gehad Hamdy/dpa/picture alliance via Getty hide caption

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Gehad Hamdy/dpa/picture alliance via Getty

An iceberg in Ilulissat, Greenland. Ice sheets in Greenland and Antarctica are melting rapidly, and that melt will accelerate as the Earth heats up. Ryan Kellman/NPR hide caption

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Ryan Kellman/NPR

Workers at a coal mine in Ukraine start their shifts. Russia's invasion of Ukraine disrupted global supplies of fossil fuels and led to more reliance on coal for electricity in some countries. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

A group of scientists from the United Kingdom trek up to a research site on the west side of the Greenland ice sheet near Kangerlussuaq in the summer of 2022. This year marks the 26th year that Greenland has lost more ice than it gained. Ryan Kellman/NPR hide caption

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Ryan Kellman/NPR

Here are 3 dangerous climate tipping points the world is on track for

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Former US Vice President Al Gore speaks during the TRACE Greenhouse Gas Inventory launch at the plenary hall during the 2022 United Nations Climate Change Conference COP27. Gehad Hamdy/dpa/Picture Alliance via Getty hide caption

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Gehad Hamdy/dpa/Picture Alliance via Getty

Muhammad Shehbaz Sharif, prime minister of Pakistan, listens to speeches during the conference. He took the stage today, as well, explaining the impact of catastrophic flooding in Pakistan this summer. Peter Dejong/AP hide caption

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Peter Dejong/AP

United Nations Secretary-General Antonio Guterres, listens to Egyptian President Abdel Fattah el-Sissi, giving a speech during the COP27 U.N. Climate Summit. Nariman El-Mofty/AP hide caption

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Nariman El-Mofty/AP

Heavy rain caused floods in northeastern Thailand in October 2022. Millions of people around the world would benefit from more timely and accurate warnings about climate-driven extreme weather such as floods and heat waves. A new United Nations initiative plans to spend $3.1 billion on such early warning systems. Sukanya Buontha/AP hide caption

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Sukanya Buontha/AP

A mine railway operator in Eastern Ukraine waits as workers disembark. Russia's invasion of Ukraine disrupted global supplies of fossil fuels and led to more reliance on coal for electricity in some countries. The future sources of energy around the world are major topics at climate negotiations underway in Egypt starting this week. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

FAQ: What's at stake at the COP27 global climate negotiations

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