Rebecca Hersher Rebecca Hersher is a reporter on NPR's Science Desk.
Rebecca Hersher at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., July 25, 2018. (photo by Allison Shelley) (Square)
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Rebecca Hersher

Allison Shelley/NPR
Rebecca Hersher at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., July 25, 2018. (photo by Allison Shelley)
Allison Shelley/NPR

Rebecca Hersher

Reporter, Science Desk

Rebecca Hersher (she/her) is a reporter on NPR's Science Desk, where she reports on outbreaks, natural disasters, and environmental and health research. Since coming to NPR in 2011, she has covered the Ebola outbreak in West Africa, embedded with the Afghan army after the American combat mission ended, and reported on floods and hurricanes in the U.S. She's also reported on research about puppies. Before her work on the Science Desk, she was a producer for NPR's Weekend All Things Considered in Los Angeles.

Hersher was part of the NPR team that won a Peabody award for coverage of the Ebola epidemic in West Africa, and produced a story from Liberia that won an Edward R. Murrow award for use of sound. She was a finalist for the 2017 Daniel Schorr prize; a 2017 Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting fellow, reporting on sanitation in Haiti; and a 2015 NPR Above the Fray fellow, investigating the causes of the suicide epidemic in Greenland.

Prior to working at NPR, Hersher reported on biomedical research and pharmaceutical news for Nature Medicine.

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In this illustration, the Sentinel-6 Michael Freilich spacecraft – the world's latest sea-level satellite – orbits Earth with its deployable solar panels extended. NASA/JPL-Caltech hide caption

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NASA/JPL-Caltech
NASA

NASA Satellite To Measure Global Sea Level Rise

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2020 Hurricane Season Sets New Devastating Records And Is Not Over Yet

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Kevin and Susan Boudreaux have survived multiple catastrophic floods in Cameron Parish, La. Storm surge from this year's Hurricane Laura severely damaged the RV park they own. Ryan Kellman/NPR hide caption

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Ryan Kellman/NPR

The Hunter power plant in Utah generates electricity by burning coal. Coal combustion releases enormous amounts of carbon into the atmosphere. The Utah plant is scheduled to keep operating until 2042. George Frey/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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George Frey/AFP via Getty Images

The Hunter power plant in Utah generates electricity by burning coal. Coal combustion releases enormous amounts of carbon into the atmosphere. The Utah plant is scheduled to keep operating until 2042. George Frey/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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George Frey/AFP via Getty Images

The remnants of Hurricane Sandy churn up Lake Michigan in Chicago in 2012. Flood risk in the city is increasing as climate change drives more extreme rain, and renters face greater financial peril than homeowners. More than half of Chicagoans are renters, according to 2019 census data. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Olson/Getty Images

Most Tenants Get No Information About Flooding. It Can Cost Them Dearly

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Lachlan (left) and Lillian Barilleau play in the backyard of their home in Central, La. They were displaced from the house for months after a flood in 2016. Ryan Kellman/NPR hide caption

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Living In Harm's Way: Why Most Flood Risk Is Not Disclosed

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Floods are the most deadly and expensive natural disaster in the U.S. And yet, in most parts of the country, it's easy to move into a flood-prone building and not even know you're in harm's way. Kaz Fantone/NPR hide caption

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Kaz Fantone/NPR

A truck sits in still water after Hurricane Laura swept through Cameron Parish, La. The hurricane inflicted at least $8 billion in damage to southwest Louisiana when it hit in late August. Ryan Kellman/NPR hide caption

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Ryan Kellman/NPR

A health care worker tests a patient for the coronavirus in Nevada in July. Scientists say a 25-year-old Nevada man was infected with the virus twice. It is the first confirmed case of reinfection in the U.S. John Locher/AP hide caption

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John Locher/AP

Scientists Confirm Nevada Man Was Infected Twice With Coronavirus

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What Will 2021 Hold For U.S. Climate Diplomacy?

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What Are The Costs Of Climate Change?

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